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  • Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport

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    Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport is an international airport under Class B airspace in Jefferson Parish, Louisiana, United States. It is owned by the city of New Orleans and is west of downtown New Orleans. The airport's address is 900 Airline Drive in Kenner, Louisiana. A small portion of Runway 11/29 is in unincorporated St. Charles Parish. Armstrong International is the primary commercial airport for the New Orleans metropolitan area and southeast Louisiana. The airport was formerly known as Moisant Field, and it is also known as Louis Armstrong International Airport and New Orleans International Airport. MSY covers 1,500 acres (607 ha) of land. Armstrong's scheduled international nonstop passenger service destinations include London–Heathrow, Frankfurt, Toronto–Pearson, Panama City, Cancun, Montego Bay, and Punta Cana. At an average of above sea level, MSY is the 2nd lowest-lying international airport in the world, behind only Amsterdam's Schiphol International Airport in the Netherlands, which is below sea level. Prior to Hurricane Katrina, MSY served 9.7 million passengers per year, nearly all of them non-connecting. In 2016 it served 11,139,421 passengers, an all-time record for the airport and 4.4% more than 2015. In 2017, the airport set yet another all-time record, with 12,009,512 passengers handled. MSY opened after World War II, replacing the older New Orleans Lakefront Airport (which kept the NEW and KNEW airport codes and now serves general aviation) as the city's main airport. MSY was renamed in 2001 after Louis Armstrong, the famous jazz musician from New Orleans. In January 2016, the airport began replacement of the current terminal by starting construction on a new terminal located on the north side of the airfield. The terminal is slated to have 35 gates, which can be expanded to 42 gates in the future.

  • Ryukyu Islands

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    The , also known as the or the , are a chain of Japanese islands that stretch southwest from Kyushu to Taiwan: the Ōsumi, Tokara, Amami, Okinawa, and Sakishima Islands (further divided into the Miyako and Yaeyama Islands), with Yonaguni the westernmost. The larger are mostly high islands and the smaller mostly coral. The largest is Okinawa Island. The climate of the islands ranges from humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa) in the north to tropical rainforest climate (Köppen climate classification Af) in the south. Precipitation is very high, and is affected by the rainy season and typhoons. Except the outlying Daitō Islands, the island chain has two major geologic boundaries, the Tokara Strait between the Tokara and Amami Islands, and the Kerama Gap between the Okinawa and Miyako Islands. The islands beyond the Tokara Strait are characterized by their coral reefs. The Ōsumi and Tokara Islands, the northernmost of the islands, fall under the cultural sphere of the Kyushu region of Japan; the people are ethnically Japanese and speak a variation of the Kagoshima dialect of Japanese.

  • Scheherazade (Rimsky-Korsakov)

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    Scheherazade, also commonly Sheherazade (), Op. 35, is a symphonic suite composed by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1888 and based on One Thousand and One Nights (also known as The Arabian Nights). This orchestral work combines two features typical of Russian music and of Rimsky-Korsakov in particular: dazzling, colorful orchestration and an interest in the East, which figured greatly in the history of Imperial Russia, as well as orientalism in general. The name "Scheherazade" refers to the main character Shahrazad of the One Thousand and One Nights. It is considered Rimsky-Korsakov's most popular work.

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