Web Results
Content Results
  • Studebaker

    serch.it?q=Studebaker

    1917 Studebaker logo Studebaker "turning wheel" badge on cars produced 1912–1934Studebaker ( ) was an American automobile manufacturer based in South Bend, Indiana. Founded in 1852 and incorporated in 1868 as the Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company, the firm was originally a producer of wagons for farmers, miners, and the military. Studebaker entered the automotive business in 1902 with electric vehicles and in 1904 with gasoline vehicles, all sold under the name "Studebaker Automobile Company". Until 1911, its automotive division operated in partnership with the Garford Company of Elyria, Ohio, and after 1909 with the E-M-F Company. The first gasoline automobiles to be fully manufactured by Studebaker were marketed in August 1912. Over the next 50 years, the company established a reputation for good quality and reliability. After years of financial problems, the company merged in 1954 with luxury carmaker Packard to form the Studebaker-Packard Corporation. However, Studebaker's financial problems were worse than the Packard executives had thought. The Packard marque was phased out, and the company returned to the Studebaker Corporation name in 1962.

  • Studebaker Lark

    serch.it?q=Studebaker-Lark

    The Studebaker Lark is a compact car which was produced by Studebaker from 1959 to 1966. From its introduction in early 1959 until 1962, the Lark was a product of the Studebaker-Packard Corporation. In mid-1962, the company dropped "Packard" from its name and reverted to its pre-1954 name, the Studebaker Corporation. In addition to being built in Studebaker's South Bend, Indiana, home plant, the Lark and its descendants were also built in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, from 1959 to 1966 by Studebaker of Canada Limited. The cars were also exported to a number of countries around the world as completed units and completely knocked down (CKD) kits. Lark-based variants represented the bulk of the range produced by Studebaker after 1958 and sold in far greater volume than the contemporary Hawk and Avanti models. Beginning with the 1963 Cruiser, the Lark name was gradually phased out of the company catalog and by early 1964, Lark-based models were being marketed under Commander, Daytona and Cruiser nameplates only. The Studebaker company, which celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1952, ceased automobile production in 1966.

  • Studebaker Starlight

    serch.it?q=Studebaker-Starlight

    1947 Commander5-passenger Couperenamed Starlight for 1949 1952 ChampionStarlight Coupe 1947 CommanderBusiness Coupe 1952 CommanderStarliner Hardtop The Starlight coupe was a unique 2-door body style offered by Studebaker Corporation of South Bend, Indiana (United States) from 1947 to 1952 in its Champion and Commander model series. It was designed by Virgil Exner, formerly of Raymond Loewy Associates.

Map Box 1