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  • Oldsmobile 98

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    The Oldsmobile 98 (sometimes spelled Ninety-Eight after 1958) is the full-size flagship model of Oldsmobile that was produced from 1940 until 1996. The name — reflecting a "Series 90" fitted with an 8-cylinder engine — first appeared in 1941 and was used again after American consumer automobile production resumed post-World War II. It was, as it would remain, the division's top-of-the-line model, with lesser Oldsmobiles having lower numbers such as the A-body 66 and 68, and the B-body 76 and 78. The Series 60 was retired in 1949, the same year the Oldsmobile 78 was replaced by the 88. The Oldsmobile 76 was retired after 1950. This left the two remaining number-names to carry on into the 1990s as the bread and butter of the full-size Oldsmobile lineup until the Oldsmobile Regency replaced the 98 in 1997. Occasionally additional nomenclature was used with the name, such as L/S and Holiday, and the 98 Regency badge would become increasingly common in the later years of the model. The 98 shared its General Motors C-body platform with Buick and Cadillac.

  • Oldsmobile Intrigue

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    The Oldsmobile Intrigue is a mid-size sedan that was manufactured from 1997 through 2002 by Oldsmobile. The Intrigue's design cues were first seen in 1995 with the Oldsmobile Antares concept car, being unveiled in production form in January 1996 at the North American International Auto Show. The Intrigue was the first casualty in the phase-out process of Oldsmobile. The Oldsmobile Intrigue was introduced on May 5, 1997 as a 1998 model. The Oldsmobile Intrigue had replaced the aging Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme. The Oldsmobile Intrigue was supposed to compete with Japanese cars, and the Intrigue had also used more of a Euro look. The Oldsmobile Intrigue was heavily inspired by the Oldsmobile Aurora and the 1995 Oldsmobile Antares concept. The Intrigue was available in three trim levels: base GX, mid-level GL, and high-end GLS. All models were equipped with standard features such as V6 power, antilock brakes, 4-wheel independent suspension, dual front airbags, and full power accessories. GL trim included the addition of a 6-way power adjustable driver's seat, 6-speaker audio system, foglamps, and dual-zone automatic climate control. Top-line GLS added 6-way power front passenger seat, faux woodgrain interior trim, steering wheel audio controls, leather seating, and full-function traction control. All Intrigues were built at the GM Fairfax plant in Kansas City, Kansas, where the Grand Prix was also built (the Buick Century and Regal, and the Chevrolet Impala and Monte Carlo were all built in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada). For the 1999 model year, a new 3.5 L DOHC engine was introduced. It was a six-cylinder design based on Cadillac's Northstar V8, which was nicknamed the "Shortstar". The 3.5 L engine became standard for 2000, giving the Intrigue the most powerful standard engine of any W-body car. Another exclusive was a standard 140 mph speedometer. With the Autobahn package the Intrigue came with larger 12-inch front brake rotors, being the first 2nd Gen W-body to incorporate bigger brakes. For 1998-99 models the Autobahn package consisted of a 3.29 differential ratio opposed to the standard 3.05, H-rated tires, 12-inch front brakes with ceramic pads, and a 128 mph speed limiter. For 2000 it was renamed Precision Sport Package which included everything from the Autobahn package except the larger 12-inch front brake rotors, and added the Precision Control System (also known as Vehicle Stability Control (VSC)). For 2002 the Intrigue Final 500 Collector’s Edition cars came in a unique Dark Cherry Metallic paint and featured Aurora-styled 17x7.5-inch chrome wheels. On June 14, 2002, the final Intrigue rolled off the assembly line as part of the Final 500 Collectors Edition.

  • Oldsmobile 88

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    The Oldsmobile 88 (marketed from 1989 on as the Eighty Eight) is a full-size car that was sold and produced by Oldsmobile from 1949 until 1999. From 1950 to 1974 the 88 was the division's top-selling line, particularly the entry-level models such as the 88 and Dynamic 88. The 88 series was also an image leader for Oldsmobile, particularly in the early years (1949–51) when it was one of the best performing automobiles thanks to its relatively small size, light weight and advanced overhead-valve high-compression V8 engine. This engine, originally designed for the larger C-bodied and more luxurious 98 series, also replaced the straight-8 on the smaller B-bodied 78. With the large, high performance V8, the Oldsmobile 88 is widely considered to be the first muscle car, although this title is disputed. A large number of variations in nomenclature were seen over this long model run — Futuramic, Super, Golden Rocket, Dynamic, Jetstar, Delta, Delmont, Starfire, Holiday, L/S, LSS, Celebrity, and Royale were used at various times with the 88 badge, and Fiesta appeared on some station wagons in the 1950s and 1960s.

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