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  • Plymouth (automobile)

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    Plymouth was a brand of automobiles based in the United States, produced by the Chrysler Corporation and its successor DaimlerChrysler. The brand first appeared in 1928 in the United States to compete in what was then described as the "low-priced" market segment dominated by Chevrolet and Ford. Plymouth was the high-volume seller for the automaker until the late 1990s. The brand was withdrawn from the marketplace in 2001. The Plymouth models that were produced up to then were either discontinued or rebranded as Chrysler or Dodge.

  • Dodge Coronet

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    The Coronet is an automobile that was marketed by Dodge as a full-size car in the 1950s, initially the division's highest trim line but, starting in 1955, the lowest trim line. From the 1965 to 1975 model years the name was on intermediate-sized models. A coronet is a small crown consisting of ornaments fixed on a metal ring.

  • Chevrolet van

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    This page talks about the 1964–1995 Chevrolet van and GMC Vandura. For the post-1995 successor, see Chevrolet Express.The Chevrolet and GMC G-series vans were made by General Motors for North America. They are in the same vehicle class as the discontinued Ford E series and Dodge Ram van. The term Chevrolet van also refers to the entire series of vans sold by Chevrolet. The first Chevrolet van was released in 1961 on the Corvair platform, and the latest Chevrolet van in production is the Chevrolet Express. The G20 and its counterparts replaced the original Chevrolet Corvair Greenbrier Van which was manufactured until 1965. First fielded in the mid-1960s, the model line evolved until it was replaced in 1996 by the Chevrolet Express. 1964-70 G20s came with six-lug wheels (6 lugs - 5.5" (139.6 mm) bolt circle), while the 1971–1995 generation came with the 5 lug - 5" (127 mm) bolt circle. G20s were fitted with the ball joints from the Chevrolet/GMC ¾- and 1-ton pickups although using the ½ ton pickup's brake rotors. A light duty version, the G10, was produced alongside the G20—the early versions used the Chevrolet passenger car wheels (5 lugs - 4.75" (120.7 mm) bolt circle) until 1975 (G10s manufactured prior to the 1976 model year had the smaller bolt pattern, common with the short wheelbase vans), yet can still handle LT tire sizes for better handling and stability. The G20 series sported an SB 262 4.3L engine, not much was changed mechanically in the vehicles since their release, other than carburetor to a throttle body injection fuel system, and less use of a vacuum system. Currently there are more after market part options available for its V8 counterparts. Not much has been done in the lines of performance options for the small V6 G20 models, but the reliability remains the same throughout all the G-series models. The G20's low cost of upkeep, size, and options have made this van popular with all different kinds of trades, from plumbers to caterers.

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