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  • Chevrolet Corvair

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    engine The Chevrolet Corvair is a compact car manufactured by Chevrolet for model years 1960–1969 across two generations. As the only American-designed, mass-produced passenger car with a rear-mounted, air-cooled engine, the Corvair was manufactured and marketed in two-door coupe, convertible, four-door sedan, four-door station wagon, passenger van, commercial van, and pickup truck body styles in its first generation (1960-1964) as well as two-door coupe, convertible and four-door sedan in its second generation (1965-1969). Competitors included the Volkswagen Beetle, Ford Falcon, Plymouth Valiant, Studebaker Lark, and the Rambler American. The Corvair's reputation and legacy were impacted by a controversy surrounding its handling: the car was scrutinized in Ralph Nader's 1965 book Unsafe at Any Speed, GM's top management resorted to unethical measures in response to its accuser, and a 1972 Texas A&M University safety commission report for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that the 1960–1963 Corvair possessed no greater potential for loss of control in extreme situations than its contemporaries.

  • Chevrolet Bel Air

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    The Chevrolet Bel Air was a full-size car produced by Chevrolet for the 1950–1981 model years. Initially only the two door hardtops in the Chevrolet model range were designated with the Bel Air name from 1950 to 1952, as distinct from the Styleline and Fleetline models for the remainder of the range. With the 1953 model year the Bel Air name was changed from a designation for a unique body shape to a premium level of trim applied across a number of body styles. The Bel Air continued with various other trim level designations until US production ceased in 1975. Production continued in Canada, for its home market only, through the 1981 model year.

  • Chevrolet S-10

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    The Chevrolet S-10 is a compact pickup truck that was produced by Chevrolet. It was the first domestically built compact pickup of the big three American automakers. When it was first introduced as a "quarter-ton pickup" in 1981 for the 1982 model year, the GMC version was known as the S-15 and later renamed the GMC Sonoma. A high-performance version was released in 1991 and given the name of GMC Syclone. The pickup was also sold by Isuzu as the Hombre from 1996 through 2000, but only in North America. There was also an SUV version, the Chevrolet S-10 Blazer/GMC S-15 Jimmy. An electric version was leased as a fleet vehicle in 1997 and 1998. Together, these pickups are often referred to as the S-series. In North America, the S-series was replaced by the Chevrolet Colorado, GMC Canyon, and Isuzu i-Series in 2004. The S-Series ended production in Brazil in 2012, being replaced by the Chevrolet Colorado, but still with the name S-10.

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