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  • Ford F-Series (sixth generation)

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    The sixth generation of the Ford F-Series is a line of pickup trucks and medium-duty commercial trucks that were produced by Ford Motor Company from 1972 to 1979. This generation was launched in December 1972 for the 1973 model year. These were the last generation of trucks to use the F-Series chassis introduced in 1965. After a decade as a compact SUV, the Ford Bronco was redesigned as a shortened version of the F-Series. This generation also marks the introduction of the F-150 (introduced in 1975) which today is the most popular model. This generation is noted for the body panels' durability as Ford used extensive amounts of galvanized sheet metal, zinc coated steel, zinc rich primer and fender liners, to fight corrosion. In 1976, the F-Series became the best-selling trucks in America, a position it has continued to retain ever since.

  • Ford F-Series (fifth generation)

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    The fifth generation of the Ford F-Series is a line of pickup trucks and commercial trucks that were produced by Ford from 1966 to 1972. Built on the same platform as the fourth generation F-series trucks, the fifth generation had sharper styling lines, a larger cab and greenhouse, and expanded engine options. Three trim levels were available during the production of the fifth generation F-series, though the names were changed in 1970. The "Base" trim became the "Custom" and the "Custom Cab" became the "Sport Custom" joining "Ranger" as optional levels of equipment and trim. Late in production the Ranger trim level was upgraded with the additional "Ranger XLT" option.

  • Ford F-Series (seventh generation)

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    1981 Ford F-150 (aftermarket modifications) 1982–1983 Ford F-100 utility (Australia-market RHD model) The seventh generation of the Ford F-Series is a line of pickup trucks and medium-duty commercial trucks that was produced by Ford from 1979 to 1986. For the first time since 1965, the pickup trucks were based upon a completely new chassis and body. Distinguished by its squarer look, sharper lines and flatter panels, the trucks were designed with improved fuel efficiency in mind; to this end, Ford added its new AOD automatic overdrive (four-speed) transmission as an option on light-duty models. The 4-speed manual and 3-speed C6 automatic transmission were retained from previous years. To increase longevity, Ford increased the use of galvanized body panels to fight corrosion. Light Pickups were available in six configurations: Regular Cab, SuperCab (extended cab), or Crew Cab (four full doors), in either 6ft or 8ft bed lengths. They are typically considered to be the last of the "classic" Ford trucks, due to features such as sealed beam headlights that would become obsolete in the next body style.

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