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  • Asphalt Ribbons

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    Asphalt Ribbons were a UK band that formed in Nottingham in 1987. The original line-up was Stuart Staples, Gaynor Backhouse, Gary Watt and Rob Howard. Dave Boulter (organ and accordion) replaced Rob Howard in 1989 and Will Carless (drums) also joined in 1989, just before they released their first EP, The Orchard, on the In-Tape label. Tracks on The Orchard were "Over Again", "Red Sauce", "Greyhound" and "I Used to Live There". In-Tape also released a radio promo copy of "Over Again" in 1989. Sounds magazine listed them as a 'name for 1990' and in the same week Melody Maker was touting them as "the first new band of this year to make the indie/mainstream crossover". During the course of 1990, Asphalt Ribbons became a six-piece, acquiring Craig Chettle (guitar). They also recorded Good Love, their second EP for In-Tape, which was produced by Jon Langford. The artwork for both EPs was by Wolfgang Buttress.

  • Fernest Arceneaux

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    Fernest Arceneaux (27 August 1940 – 4 September 2008) was a French speaking Creole Zydeco accordionist and singer from Louisiana.

  • Pantograph

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    Drafting pantograph in use Pantograph used for scaling a picture. The red shape is traced and enlarged. Pantograph 3d rendering A pantograph (Greek roots παντ- "all, every" and γραφ- "to write", from their original use for copying writing) is a mechanical linkage connected in a manner based on parallelograms so that the movement of one pen, in tracing an image, produces identical movements in a second pen. If a line drawing is traced by the first point, an identical, enlarged, or miniaturized copy will be drawn by a pen fixed to the other. Using the same principle, different kinds of pantographs are used for other forms of duplication in areas such as sculpture, minting, engraving and milling. Because of the shape of the original device, a pantograph also refers to a kind of structure that can compress or extend like an accordion, forming a characteristic rhomboidal pattern. This can be found in extension arms for wall-mounted mirrors, temporary fences, scissor lifts, and other scissor mechanisms such as the pantograph used on electric locomotives and trams.

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