Web Results
Content Results
  • Western Union splice

    serch.it?q=Western-Union-splice

    Figures A through D show how to make a "short tie" Western Union splice. Figures E and F show "long tie" variations. The Western Union or Lineman splice was developed during the introduction of the telegraph to mechanically and electrically connect wires that were subject to loading stress. The wrapping pattern is designed to cause the termination to tighten as the conductors pull against each other. This type of splice is more suited to solid, rather than stranded conductors. The Western Union Splice is made by twisting two ends of a wire together, traditionally counterclockwise, 3/4 of a turn each, finger tight. Then, usually using needle-nose pliers, the ends are twisted at least five more turns, tightly. The cut off ends are pushed close to the center wire. "Short tie" and "long tie" variations exist, mainly for purposes of coating the connection with solder. The longer version may aid in solder flow. NASA tests on 22 and 16 AWG wire showed that the Western Union Splice when soldered is very strong and is stronger than the wire alone if done properly.

  • List of How It's Made episodes

    serch.it?q=List-of-How-It's-Made-episodes

    How It's Made is a documentary television series that premiered on January 6, 2001 on the Discovery Channel (now known as Discovery Science in Canada, and Science in the UK and US.) The program is produced in the Canadian province of Quebec by Productions MAJ, Inc. and Productions MAJ 2. In the UK, it is broadcast on Discovery Channel, Quest, and DMAX.

  • Rope splicing

    serch.it?q=Rope-splicing

    Stages in splicing the end of a rope, from Scientific American, 1871Rope splicing in ropework is the forming of a semi-permanent joint between two ropes or two parts of the same rope by partly untwisting and then interweaving their strands. Splices can be used to form a stopper at the end of a line, to form a loop or an eye in a rope, or for joining two ropes together. Splices are preferred to knotted rope, since while a knot typically reduces the strength by 20–40%, a splice is capable of attaining a rope's full strength. However, splicing usually results in a thickening of the line and, if subsequently removed, leaves a distortion of the rope. Most types of splices are used on 3-strand rope, but some can be done on 12-strand or greater single-braided rope, as well as most double braids. While a spliced 3-strand rope's strands are interwoven to create the splice, a braided rope's splice is constructed by simply pulling the rope into its jacket.

Map Box 1