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  • Blackface

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    William H. West minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co., shows the transformation from "white" to "black".Blackface is a form of theatrical make-up used predominantly by non-black performers to represent a caricature of a black person. African-Americans consider it a racially insensitive representation of their community. The practice gained popularity during the 19th century and contributed to the spread of racial stereotypes such as the "happy-go-lucky darky on the plantation" or the "dandified coon". By the middle of the century, blackface minstrel shows had become a distinctive American artform, translating formal works such as opera into popular terms for a general audience. Early in the 20th century, blackface branched off from the minstrel show and became a form in its own right.

  • Rudolph Valentino

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    Rodolfo Alfonso Raffaello Pierre Filibert Guglielmi di Valentina d'Antonguella (May 6, 1895 – August 23, 1926), professionally known as Rudolph Valentino, was an Italian actor in the United States who starred in several well-known silent films including The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, The Sheik, Blood and Sand, The Eagle, and The Son of the Sheik. He was an early pop icon, a sex symbol of the 1920s, who was known as the "Latin lover" or simply as "Valentino". His premature death at the age of 31 caused mass hysteria among his female fans and further propelled him to iconic status.

  • Top hat

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    The King of the Belgians and the Royal family with Queen Victoria ca. 1859 Austin Lane Crothers, 46th Governor of Maryland (1908–1912), wearing a top hat A top hat, beaver hat, high hat, silk hat, cylinder hat, chimney pot hat or stove pipe hat, sometimes also known by the nickname "topper", is a tall, flat-crowned, broad-brimmed hat, worn by men from the latter part of the 18th to the middle of the 20th century. By the end of World War II, it had become a rarity in ordinary dress, though it continued to be worn in specific instances, such as state funerals, also by those occupying prominent positions in the Bank of England, by certain City stock exchange officials and occasionally when passing between the Law Courts and Lincoln's Inn, London by judges of the Chancery Division and Queen's Counsel. , top hats are still worn at some society events in the UK, notably at church weddings and racing meetings attended by members of the royal family, such as Royal Ascot. They remain part of the formal uniform of certain British institutions, such as the boy-choristers of King's College Choir.

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