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  • Working holiday visa

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    A working holiday visa is a residence permit allowing travellers to undertake employment (and sometimes study) in the country issuing the visa to supplement their travel funds. For many young people, holding a working holiday visa enables them to experience living in a foreign country without undergoing the usual costly expenses of finding work sponsorship in advance or going on expensive university exchange programmes. Most working holiday visas are offered under reciprocal agreements between certain countries to encourage travel and cultural exchange between their citizens. There are often several restrictions on this type of visa: Many are intended for young travellers and, as such, have an age restriction (usually from 18 to 30 or 35). There are usually limits on the type of employment taken or the length of time the traveller can be employed. The visa holder is expected to have sufficient funds to live on while employment is sought. The visa holder should have some kind of health or travel insurance for the duration of the stay unless the country will cover.

  • E-2 visa

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    The E-2 Investor Visa allows an individual to enter and work inside of the United States based on an investment he or she will be controlling, while inside the United States. The E2 visa is good for three months to five years (depending on the country of origin) and can be extended indefinitely. The investment must be "substantial." Investor visas are available only to citizens of certain countries. E-2 visas are also available to non-investor employees of the business, as long as the persons are of the same nationality as the investor and are destined for a role in the US business that is either executive/supervisory or requires specialized skills that are essential to the efficient operation of the US enterprise. For new startups, the investment must be large enough to start and operate the business. The amount of investment varies on the type of business. The investment will not be considered substantial if it is not large enough to capitalize the venture. The USCIS will use an "Inverted Sliding Scale" to determine whether the investment is substantial in proportion to the overall cost of the enterprise.

  • Visa policy of the United States

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    A US visa specimen Entry passport stamp for the United States issued to a citizen of Singapore by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection at Detroit Metropolitan Airport. The visa policy of the United States deals with the requirements which a foreign national wishing to enter the United States must meet to obtain a visa, which is a permit to travel to, enter, and remain in the United States. Visitors to the United States must obtain a visa from one of the United States diplomatic missions unless they come from one of the visa-exempt countries or Visa Waiver Program countries. The same rules apply to Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands while different rules apply to Guam, Northern Mariana Islands and American Samoa.

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