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  • Nerf bar

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    A 2002 Ford Explorer Sport Trac with a black nerf bar hanging from the body on the bottom left. A nerf bar is a tubular device fitted to the side of a racecar, typically single-seat race cars that compete on asphalt or dirt oval tracks. A "nerf" is a small, sometimes intentional, collision between two cars in which one driver bumps the other to facilitate a successful pass. The nerf bar protects the sides of the vehicles and also keeps their tires from becoming entangled. If fast-spinning tires come in contact with each other, one or both of the cars may lose control or even become airborne. These are commonly used on Modifieds such as used in the NASCAR Whelen Modified Series, and the wheel pods behind the rear wheels on a Dallara DW12 INDYCAR is often nicknamed the nerf bar because of the similar purpose. A more commercial application of the nerf bar is for convenience purposes on a pickup truck or sport utility vehicle. It may act as a step to ease entry and exit from the vehicle, or to help prevent damage to the vehicle when crossing rocks off-road. Nerf bars can also be used to double as side bull bars on off-road vehicles.

  • Chevrolet Silverado

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    The Chevrolet Silverado, and its mechanically identical cousin the GMC Sierra, are a series of full-size and heavy-duty pickup trucks manufactured by General Motors and introduced in 1998 as the successor to the long-running Chevrolet C/K line. The Silverado name was taken from a trim level previously used on its predecessor, the Chevrolet C/K pickup truck from 1975 through 1998. General Motors continues to offer a GMC-badged variant of the Chevrolet full-size pickup under the GMC Sierra name, first used in 1987 for its variant of the GMT400 platform trucks. The heavy-duty trucks are informally referred to as "Silverado HD" (and Sierra HD), while the light-duty version is referred simply to as "Silverado" (and Sierra).

  • Mazda B series

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    The Mazda B series is a series of pickup trucks first manufactured in 1961 by Mazda. Since the launch of the B series, Mazda has used the engine displacement to determine each model's name; the B1500 had a 1.5 L engine and the B2600 had a 2.6 L engine. In Japan, the name Mazda Proceed was used for the compact pickup. Other names used for this line include Mazda Bravo (Australia), Mazda Bounty (New Zealand), Mazda Magnum/Thunder/Fighter (Thailand), and Mazda Drifter (South Africa). Mazda's partnership with Ford resulted in both companies selling this vehicle under different names; Ford called its version the Ford Courier, and later the Ford Ranger. The Mazda B-series and Ford Ranger models sold in North America were developed by Ford, whereas models sold elsewhere under the same badge were engineered by Mazda.

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