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  • ?scid=47166&utm source=shopping&utm medium=connexity&utm campaign=gen program&utm content=shopping cse&CAWELAID=1782933859&szredirectid=SZ REDIRECT ID

    serch.it?q=?scid=47166&utm-source=shopping&utm-med

  • Food fortification

    serch.it?q=Food-fortification

    Food fortification or enrichment is the process of adding micronutrients (essential trace elements and vitamins) to food. Sometimes it's a purely commercial choice to provide extra nutrients in a food, while other times it is a public health policy which aims to reduce the number of people with dietary deficiencies within a population. Staple foods of a region can lack particular nutrients due to the soil of the region or from inherent inadequacy of a normal diet. Addition of micronutrients to staples and condiments can prevent large-scale deficiency diseases in these cases. As defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), fortification refers to "the practice of deliberately increasing the content of an essential micronutrient, ie.

  • Mineral deficiency

    serch.it?q=Mineral-deficiency

    Mineral deficiency is a lack of the dietary minerals, the micronutrients that are needed for an organism's proper health. The cause may be a poor diet, impaired uptake of the minerals that are consumed or a dysfunction in the organism's use of the mineral after it is absorbed. These deficiencies can result in many disorders including anemia and goitre. Examples of mineral deficiency include, zinc deficiency, iron deficiency, and magnesium deficiency.

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