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  • Selenium deficiency

    serch.it?q=Selenium-deficiency

    Selenium deficiency is relatively rare in healthy well-nourished individuals. Few cases in humans have been reported.

  • Cholecalciferol

    serch.it?q=Cholecalciferol

    Cholecalciferol, also known as vitamin D3 and colecalciferol, is a type of vitamin D which is made by the skin when exposed to sunlight, it also found in some foods and can be taken as a dietary supplement. It is used to treat and prevent vitamin D deficiency and associated diseases, including rickets. It is also used for familial hypophosphatemia, hypoparathyroidism that is causing low blood calcium, and Fanconi syndrome. It is usually taken by mouth. Excessive doses can result in vomiting, constipation, weakness, and confusion. Other risks include kidney stones. Normal doses are safe in pregnancy. It may not be effective in people with severe kidney disease. Cholecalciferol is made in the skin following UVB light exposure. It is converted in the liver to calcifediol (25-hydroxyvitamin D) which is then converted in the kidney to calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D). One of its actions is to increase the uptake of calcium by the intestines. It is found in food such as some fish, cheese, and eggs. Certain foods such as milk have cholecalciferol added to them in some countries. Cholecalciferol was first described in 1936. It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system. Cholecalciferol is available as a generic medication and over the counter.

  • Airborne (dietary supplement)

    serch.it?q=Airborne-(dietary-supplement)

    Airborne is a dietary supplement containing herbal extracts, amino acids, antioxidants, electrolytes, vitamins, and other ingredients marketed to prevent the common cold and improve immune function. The benefits of its use are uncertain. There are no studies supporting Airborne's effectiveness that meet scientific standards. The former owners were fined by the Federal Trade Commission for deceptive advertising and were the subject of successful class actions. It was created by schoolteacher Victoria Knight-McDowell in the early 1990s. The website does not list any side effects that one might experience after taking Airborne, aside from "some sensitivity to any of the vitamins or herbal extracts". It is offered for sale over-the-counter in many U.S. retail stores in multiple forms: effervescent tablet, gummy, chewable tablet, lozenge, tablet, or powder.

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