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  • Honda Insight

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    The Honda Insight is a hybrid electric vehicle that was manufactured and marketed by Honda in its first generation as a three-door, two passenger liftback (1999–2006) and in its second generation as a five-door, five passenger liftback (2009–2014). In its third generation, it became a four-door sedan (2019-present). It was the Honda's first model with Integrated Motor Assist system and the most fuel efficient gasoline-powered car available in the U.S. without plug-in capability — for the length of its production run. EPA estimates were 61 City/70 Highway/65 Combined, under then-current EPA standards. Subsequent EPA standards reduced the estimates to 49 City/61 Highway/53 Combined. Honda introduced the second-generation Insight in Japan in February 2009 and in the United States on March 24, 2009. The Insight was the least expensive hybrid available in the US. In December 2010, Honda introduced a less expensive base model for the 2011 model year. The Insight was launched April 2009 in the UK as the lowest priced hybrid on the market and became the best selling hybrid for the month. The Insight ranked as the top-selling vehicle in Japan for the month of April 2009, a first for a hybrid model. During its first twelve months after first available in the Japanese market, the second-generation Insight sold 143,015 units around the world. In July 2014 Honda announced the end of production of the Insight for the 2015 model, together with the Honda FCX Clarity hydrogen fuel-cell car and the Honda Fit EV electric car.

  • Fuel economy in automobiles

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    Fuel consumption monitor from a 2006 Honda Airwave. The displayed fuel economy is . A 1916 experiment in creating a fuel-saving automobile in the United States. The vehicle weighed only 135 pounds (61.2 kg) and was an adaptation of a small gasoline engine originally designed to power a bicycle. The fuel economy of an automobile relates distance traveled by a vehicle and the amount of fuel consumed. Consumption can be expressed in terms of volume of fuel to travel a distance, or the distance travelled per unit volume of fuel consumed. Since fuel consumption of vehicles is a significant factor in air pollution, and since importation of motor fuel can be a large part of a nation's foreign trade, many countries impose requirements for fuel economy. Different methods are used to approximate the actual performance of the vehicle. The energy in fuel is required to overcome various losses (wind resistance, tire drag, and others) encountered while propelling the vehicle, and in providing power to vehicle systems such as ignition or air conditioning. Various strategies can be employed to reduce losses at each of the conversions between the chemical energy in the fuel and the kinetic energy of the vehicle. Driver behavior can affect fuel economy; maneuvers such as sudden acceleration and heavy braking waste energy. Electric cars do not directly burn fuel, and so do not have fuel economy per se, but equivalence measures, such as miles per gallon gasoline equivalent have been created to attempt to compare them.

  • Economy car

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    Economy car is a term mostly used in the United States for cars designed for low-cost purchase and operation. Typical economy cars are small (compact or subcompact), lightweight, and inexpensive to buy. Economy car designers are forced by stringent design constraints to be inventive. Many innovations in automobile design were originally developed for economy cars, such as the Ford Model T and the Austin Mini. The alternative approach, other than innovating to build a low-cost car, is to build a stripped-down, no-frills version of a conventional car. Gordon Murray, the Formula 1 and McLaren F1 designer, said when designing his new Murray T.25 city car: "I would say that building a car to sell for six thousand pounds and designing that for a high-volume production, where you have all the quality issues under control, is a hundred times more difficult than designing a McLaren F1, or even a racing car. It is certainly the biggest challenge I've ever had from a design point of view."

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