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  • Chow mein

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    Chow mein (and , ) are Chinese stir-fried noodles, the name being the romanization of the Taishanese chāu-mèing. The dish is popular throughout the Chinese diaspora and appears on the menus of most Chinese restaurants. It is particularly popular in India, Nepal, the UK and the US. 1. Etymology ------------ The words chow mein mean 'stir-fried noodles', chow meaning 'stir-fried' (or "sautéed") and mein meaning 'noodles'. The pronunciation chow mein is an English corruption of the Taishanese pronunciation chāu-mèing. The lightly pronounced Taishanese , resembling the end of a Portuguese nasal vowel, was taken to be by English speakers. The Taishan dialect was spoken by migrants to North America from Taishan.

  • Lo mein

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    Lo mein () is a Chinese dish with egg noodles. It often contains vegetables and some type of meat or seafood, usually beef, chicken, pork, shrimp or wontons. It can also be eaten with just vegetables. Traditionally this is a dry variation of wonton noodle soup. The soup is simply separated from the noodles and other ingredients, and served on the side.

  • Stir frying

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    For the 2018 song by Migos, see Stir Fry (song).A ginger chicken stir fry in a wok Stir frying () is a Chinese cooking technique in which ingredients are fried in a small amount of very hot oil while being stirred in a wok. The technique originated in China and in recent centuries has spread into other parts of Asia and the West. Scholars think that wok (or pan) frying may have been used as early as the Han dynasty (206 B.C. – 220 A.D.) for drying grain, not for cooking, but it was not until the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) that the wok reached its modern shape and allowed quick cooking in hot oil. Well into the 20th century, while restaurants and affluent families could afford the oil and fuel needed for stir fry, the most widely used cooking techniques remained boiling and steaming. Stir fry cooking came to predominate over the course of the century as more people could afford oil and fuel, and in the West spread beyond Chinese communities. Stir frying and Chinese food have been recommended as both healthy and appealing for their skillful use of vegetables, meats, and fish which are moderate in their fat content and sauces which are not overly rich, provided calories are kept at a reasonable level. The term "stir-fry" was introduced into the English language in Buwei Yang Chao's book How to Cook and Eat in Chinese (1945), to describe the chǎo technique.

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