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  • Duct tape occlusion therapy

    serch.it?q=Duct-tape-occlusion-therapy

    Duct tape occlusion therapy (DTOT) is a method of treating warts by covering them with duct tape for prolonged periods. The manner in which duct tape appears to work is unclear. The tape might create a macerating and keratolytic environment, stimulating an immune response. The type of adhesive in the duct tape may also be important. Side effects are rare, although skin irritation may occur. There is mixed evidence that occlusive treatment with various types of duct tape is effective. Clinical trials in 2012 concluded that no statistically significant difference between clear duct tape and placebo could be determined within the sample. On health information websites, duct tape is referred to as a treatment with mixed evidence of efficacy, no good evidence or described as alternative medicine.

  • Salicylic acid

    serch.it?q=Salicylic-acid

    Salicylic acid (from Latin salix, willow tree) is a lipophilic monohydroxybenzoic acid, a type of phenolic acid, and a beta hydroxy acid (BHA). It has the formula C7H6O3. This colorless crystalline organic acid is widely used in organic synthesis and functions as a plant hormone. It is derived from the metabolism of salicin. In addition to serving as an important active metabolite of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), which acts in part as a prodrug to salicylic acid, it is probably best known for its use as a key ingredient in topical anti-acne products. The salts and esters of salicylic acid are known as salicylates. It is on the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.

  • Wart

    serch.it?q=Wart

    Warts are typically small, rough, and hard growths that are similar in color to the rest of the skin. They typically do not result in other symptoms, except when on the bottom of the feet where they may be painful. While they usually occur on the hands and feet they can also affect other locations. One or many warts may appear. They are not cancerous. Warts are caused by infection with a type of human papillomavirus (HPV). Factors that increase the risk include use of public showers, working with meat, eczema, and a low immune system. The virus is believed to enter the body through skin that has been damaged slightly. A number of types exist, including common warts, plantar warts, filiform warts, and genital warts. Genital warts are often sexually transmitted. Without treatment, most types of warts resolve in months to years. A number of treatments may speed resolution including salicylic acid applied to the skin and cryotherapy. In those who are otherwise healthy they do not typically result in significant problems. Treatment of genital warts differs from that of other types. Warts are very common, with most people being infected at some point in their lives. The estimated current rate of non-genital warts among the general population is 1–13%. They are more common among young people. Estimated rates of genital warts in sexually active women is 12%. Warts have been described at least as far back as 400 BC by Hippocrates.

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