Web Results
Content Results
  • Mercedes-Benz 7G-Tronic transmission

    serch.it?q=Mercedes-Benz-7G-Tronic-transmission

    7G-Tronic (coded 722.9) is Mercedes-Benz's trademark name for its seven-speed automatic transmission. This fifth-generation transmission was introduced in the Autumn of 2003 on 8-cylinder models, and was the first seven-speed automatic transmission ever used on a production passenger vehicle. The 7G-Tronic initially debuted on five different eight-cylinder models: the E500, S430, S500, CL500, and SL500. It also soon became available on many six-cylinder models. Turbocharged V12 engines, four cylinder applications and commercial vehicles continued to use the older Mercedes-Benz 5G-Tronic transmission for many years. The company claims that the 7G-Tronic is more fuel efficient and has shorter acceleration times and quicker intermediate sprints than the outgoing 5-speed automatic transmission. The 7G-Tronic has two reverse gear ratios: 3.416 and 2.231. The winter mode, also recently named 'comfort' mode, starts out in 2nd forward and 2nd reverse. The transmission can skip gears when downshifting. It also has a lockup torque converter on all seven gears, allowing better transmission of torque for improved acceleration. The transmission's case is made of magnesium, a first for the industry, to save weight. The 7G-Tronic is the fifth-generation transmission for Mercedes-Benz. About 65 percent of Mercedes-Benz C-Class sedans, wagons, and sport coupes are purchased with automatic transmissions (with that figure rising). However, about 88 percent of Mercedes-Benz E-Class sedans and wagons are purchased with automatic transmissions, and automatic transmissions are standard on the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The 7G-Tronic transmission is built at the Mercedes-Benz Stuttgart-Untertuerkheim plant in Germany, the site of Daimler-Benz's original production facility. The transmission is currently available on the SsangYong's vehicles like Rexton, and Korando Turismo (in South Korea)/Turismo (in UK). In July 2009, Mercedes-Benz announced they are working on a new nine-speed automatic.

  • Mercedes-Benz W124

    serch.it?q=Mercedes-Benz-W124

    W124 is the Mercedes-Benz internal chassis-designation for the 1984/85 to 1995/96 version of the Mercedes-Benz E-Class, as well as the first generation to be officially referred to as E-Class. The W124 models replaced the W123 models after 1985 and were succeeded by the W210 E-Class after 1995. In North America, the W124 was launched in early November 1985 as a 1986 model and sold through the 1995 model year, through November 7, 1995. Series production began at the beginning of November 1984, with press reveal taking place on Monday, November 26, 1984 in Sevilla, Spain, with customer deliveries and European market launch starting in January 1985.

  • Mercedes-Benz OM642 engine

    serch.it?q=Mercedes-Benz-OM642-engine

    The Mercedes-Benz OM642 engine is a 3.0-liter, 72° 24-valve, aluminium/aluminium block and heads diesel V6 engine manufactured by the Mercedes-Benz division of Daimler AG as a replacement for the Mercedes- straight 5 and straight 6 cylinder engines. The engine features common rail fuel injection and a variable nozzle turbocharger. The injection system operates at , while the compression ratio is 18:1. The engine features a counter-rotating balance shaft mounted between the cylinder banks to cancel the vibrations inherent to the 72 degree V6 design, and the crankpins are offset by 48 degrees to achieve even 120 degree firing intervals. In some heavy vehicle applications, Mercedes' BlueTec AdBlue urea injection is utilised for NOx reduction. In lighter vehicle applications, a NOx storage catalyst captures nitrous oxides, which are periodically purged (decomposed) by running the engine slightly rich. A particulate filter lowers soot, making this engine ULEV certified. Engine mass is . Power output is and of torque. For the 2007 model year, torque is raised to 540 Nm. Beginning of summer 2017 the engine, together with Mercedes-Benz OM651 is in discussion that depending if the engine is operated in laboratory emissions testing a different amount of diesel exhaust fluid is used than in real world operating scenarios.

Map Box 1