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  • Mercedes-Benz CL-Class (C216)

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    The Mercedes-Benz C216 is the last generation for the grand tourer Mercedes-Benz CL-Class. It replaced the C215 platform. In 2014 it was replaced by the C217 S-Class Coupe.

  • Mercedes-Benz E-Class (W212)

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    The W212 and S212 Mercedes-Benz E-Class series is the fourth-generation of the E-Class range of executive cars which was produced by Mercedes-Benz between 2009 and 2016 as the successor to the W211 E-Class. The body styles of the range are: 4-door sedan/saloon (W212) 5-door estate/wagon (S212)Coupé and convertible models of the E-Class of the same vintage are W204 C-Class derived and known as the C207 and A207, replacing the CLK-Class coupe and cabriolet. A high-performance E63 AMG version of the W212 and S212 were available as well since 2009. In 2013, a facelift was introduced for the E-Class range, featuring significant styling changes, fuel economy improvements and updated safety features. After being unveiled at the 2009 North American International Auto Show to invited members of the press and put on public display at 2009 Geneva Motor Show, it was introduced in March 2009 for Europe and in July 2009 for North America in the sedan body style. In 2010, an estate body style became available to all markets, though the estate body style was available in Europe since August 2009. Global cumulative E-Class sales reached the milestone 550,000 vehicle mark in July 2011.

  • Tyrrell P34

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    The Tyrrell P34 (Project 34), commonly known as the "six-wheeler", was a Formula One (F1) race car designed by Derek Gardner, Tyrrell's chief designer. The car used four specially manufactured 10-inch diameter (254 mm) wheels and tyres at the front, with two ordinary-sized wheels at the back. Along with the Brabham BT46B "fancar" developed in , the six-wheeled Tyrrell was one of the most radical entries ever to succeed in F1 competition and has been called the most recognizable design in the history of world motorsports. The P34 was introduced in September 1975 and began racing in the 1976 season. It proved successful and led other teams to begin design of six-wheeled platforms of their own. Changes to the design made for the 1977 season made it uncompetitive and the concept was abandoned for Tyrrell's 1978 season. The other six-wheeled designs ended development and F1 rules later stipulated that cars must have four wheels in total. The existing frames have since seen some success in various "classics" race events, but today are museum pieces.

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