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  • Land Rover series

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    The Land Rover series I, II, and III (commonly referred to as series Land Rovers, to distinguish them from later models) are off-road vehicles produced by the British manufacturer Rover Company. The Land Rover was the first mass-produced civilian four-wheel drive car with doors on it. In 1992, Land Rover claimed that 70% of all the vehicles they had built were still in use. Series models feature leaf-sprung suspension with selectable two or four-wheel drive (4WD); with the exception of 1948 to mid 1951 had constant 4wd via a freewheel mechanism .the Stage 1 V8 version of the series III featured permanent 4WD. All three models could be started with a front hand crank and had the option of a rear power takeoff for accessories.

  • Volkswagen Golf Mk1

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    The Volkswagen Golf Mk1 is the first generation of a small family car manufactured and marketed by Volkswagen. It was noteworthy for signalling Volkswagen's shift of its major car lines from rear-wheel drive and rear-mounted air-cooled engines to front-wheel drive with front-mounted, water-cooled engines that were often transversely-mounted. Successor to Volkswagen's iconic Beetle, the first generation Golf debuted in Europe in May 1974 with styling by Giorgetto Giugiaro's ItalDesign.

  • Westfalia

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    Westfalia Nugget / Ford TransitWestfalia is the designation of various specially converted Volkswagen camper vans. It is named after Westfalia-Werke, the contractor that built the vans, which is headquartered in the town of Rheda-Wiedenbrück, located in the Westphalia region of Germany. Westfalia-Werke also converted non-Volkswagen vans, and produced trailers and other products, but they were best known for their Volkswagen camper conversions. Westfalia began converting Volkswagen buses in 1951. Their famous "pop-top" package was added later, and became very popular on the second-generation VW Bus from 1966 to 1979, its successor the Vanagon, the Sven Hedin and Florida conversions on the Volkswagen LT, and then the T4 EuroVan, which was discontinued in 2003. This design also inspired many imitators, with dozens of other companies worldwide offering pop-top van conversions. Therefore, not all pop-top Volkswagens are Westfalia conversions, although in the United States, the Westfalia conversion was by far the most common. Conversely, not all Volkswagen Westfalia conversions had pop-tops or cooking facilities.

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