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  • Police car

    serch.it?q=Police-car

    A police car (also called a police cruiser, cop car, prowler, squad car, radio car, or radio motor patrol (RMP) ) is a ground vehicle used by police for transportation during patrols and to enable them to respond to incidents and chases. Typical uses of a police car include transporting officers so they can reach the scene of an incident quickly, transporting and temporarily detaining suspects in the back seats, as a location to use their police radio or laptop or to patrol an area, all while providing a visible deterrent to crime. Some police cars are specially adapted for certain locations (e.g. traffic duty on busy roads) or for certain operations (e.g. to transport police dogs or bomb squads). Police cars typically have rooftop flashing lights, a siren, and emblems or markings indicating that the vehicle is a police car. Some police cars may have reinforced bumpers and alley lights, for illuminating darkened alleys. Terms for police cars include area car and patrol car. In some places, a police car may also be informally known as a cop car, a black and white, a cherry top, a gumball machine, a jam sandwich or panda car. Depending on the configuration of the emergency lights and livery, a police car may be considered a marked or unmarked unit.

  • Vehicle impoundment

    serch.it?q=Vehicle-impoundment

    Vehicle impoundment is the legal process of placing a vehicle into an impoundment lot or tow yard, which is a holding place for cars until they are placed back in the control of the owner, recycled for their metal, stripped of their parts at a wrecking yard or auctioned off for the benefit of the impounding agency. The impounding agency can be a police department while all terms are negotiated between politicians and towing companies.

  • 1033 program

    serch.it?q=1033-program

    Slide from the Defense Logistics Agency's brochure, describing the 1033 Program's transfer of military equipment to American police forces. In the United States, the 1033 Program transfers excess military equipment to civilian law enforcement agencies. The program legally requires the Department of Defense to make various items of equipment available to local law enforcement. , 8,000 local law enforcement agencies participated in the program that has transferred $5.1 billion in military material from the Department of Defense to law enforcement agencies since 1997. According to the Defense Logistics Agency, material worth $449 million was transferred in 2013 alone. Some of the most commonly requested items include ammunition, cold weather clothing, sand bags, medical supplies, sleeping bags, flashlights and electrical wiring. Small arms and vehicles such as aircraft, watercraft and armored vehicles have also been obtained. The program has been criticized over the years by local media, by the Office of the Inspector General, U.S. Department of Defense in 2003, and by the GAO which found waste, fraud and abuse. It was not until media coverage of police during August 2014 Ferguson unrest that the program drew nationwide public attention; the Ferguson Police Department had equipment obtained through the 1033 program. President Obama signed Executive Order 13688 on May 2015 limiting and prohibiting certain types of equipment. On 28 August 2017 President Trump rolled back Obama's Executive Order. The ACLU and the NAACP have raised concerns about they call the militarization of police forces in the US. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the move early Monday morning of that week at the Fraternal Order of Police convention in Nashville, and said the president would do so by executive order. At the same time, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and the director of the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) pointed out the use of 1033 equipment as life saving devices seeing restrictions on distributing military surplus to police as “too far." The FOP also pointed out that the armored vehicles weren't tanks.

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