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  • Middle back pain

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    Upper back pain, also called middle back pain or thoracic back pain, is back pain that is felt in the region of the thoracic vertebrae, which are between the bottom of the neck and top of the lumbar spine. It has a number of potential causes, ranging from muscle strain to collapse of a vertebra or rare serious diseases. The upper spine is very strong and stable to support the weight of the upper body, as well as to anchor the rib cage which provides a cavity to allow the heart and lungs to function and protect them. In most cases, the pain is likely to be self-limiting; in that case no diagnostic tests are required, and simple pain relief is sufficient. More severe and prolonged cases may require more specific pain management strategies and occasionally investigations for underlying medical diseases.

  • Side stitch

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    Side stitch (also called a side ache, a side cramp, a side crampie, a side sticker or simply the stitch) is an intense stabbing pain under the lower edge of the ribcage that occurs while exercising. It is also referred to as exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP). Some people think that this abdominal pain may be caused by the internal organs (like the liver and stomach) pulling downwards on the diaphragm, but that hypothesis is inconsistent with its frequent occurrence during swimming, which involves almost no downward force on these organs. If the pain is present only when exercising and is completely absent at rest, in an otherwise healthy person, it does not require investigation.

  • Low back pain

    serch.it?q=Low-back-pain

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common disorder involving the muscles, nerves, and bones of the back. Pain can vary from a dull constant ache to a sudden sharp feeling. Low back pain may be classified by duration as acute (pain lasting less than 6 weeks), sub-chronic (6 to 12 weeks), or chronic (more than 12 weeks). The condition may be further classified by the underlying cause as either mechanical, non-mechanical, or referred pain. The symptoms of low back pain usually improve within a few weeks from the time they start, with 40–90% of people completely better by six weeks. In most episodes of low back pain, a specific underlying cause is not identified or even looked for, with the pain believed to be due to mechanical problems such as muscle or joint strain. If the pain does not go away with conservative treatment or if it is accompanied by "red flags" such as unexplained weight loss, fever, or significant problems with feeling or movement, further testing may be needed to look for a serious underlying problem. In most cases, imaging tools such as X-ray computed tomography are not useful and carry their own risks. Despite this, the use of imaging in low back pain has increased.

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