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  • Xerostomia

    serch.it?q=Xerostomia

    Xerostomia, also known as dry mouth, is dryness in the mouth, which may be associated with a change in the composition of saliva, or reduced salivary flow, or have no identifiable cause. This symptom is very common and is often seen as a side effect of many types of medication. It is more common in older people (mostly because this group tend to take several medications) and in persons who breathe through their mouths (mouthbreathing). Dehydration, radiotherapy involving the salivary glands, chemotherapy and several diseases can cause hyposalivation or a change in saliva consistency and hence a complaint of xerostomia. Sometimes there is no identifiable cause, and there may be a psychogenic reason for the complaint.

  • Hypersalivation

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    Hypersalivation (also called ptyalism or sialorrhea) is excessive production of saliva. It has also been defined as increased amount of saliva in the mouth, which may also be caused by decreased clearance of saliva. Hypersalivation can contribute to drooling if there is an inability to keep the mouth closed or difficulty in swallowing the excess saliva (dysphagia), which can lead to excessive spitting. Hypersalivation also often precedes emesis (vomiting), where it accompanies nausea (a feeling of needing to vomit).

  • Burning mouth syndrome

    serch.it?q=Burning-mouth-syndrome

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a burning sensation in the mouth with no underlying dental or medical cause. No related signs of disease are found in the mouth. People with burning mouth syndrome may also have a dry mouth sensation where no cause can be found such as reduced salivary flow, tingling in the mouth, or an altered taste or smell. A burning sensation in the mouth can be a symptom of another disease when local or systemic factors are found to be implicated, and this is not considered to be burning mouth syndrome, which is a syndrome of medically unexplained symptoms. The International Association for the Study of Pain defines burning mouth syndrome as "a distinctive nosological entity characterized by unremitting oral burning or similar pain in the absence of detectable mucosal changes", and "burning pain in the tongue or other oral mucous membranes", and the International Headache Society defines it as "an intra-oral burning sensation for which no medical or dental cause can be found". Due to insufficient evidence it is unclear if effective treatments exist.

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