Web Results
Content Results
  • Acanthosis

    serch.it?q=Acanthosis

    Acanthosis nigricans Acanthosis is diffuse epidermal hyperplasia (thickening of the skin). It implies increased thickness of the Malpighian layer (stratum basale and stratum spinosum). Acanthosis Nigricans is often associated with Diabetes Mellitus type 2, and is usually observed in the back of neck, axilla, and other folded regions of the skin. However, Acanthosis Nigricans can also be associated with other conditions such as Niacin toxicity.

  • Palmoplantar keratoderma

    serch.it?q=Palmoplantar-keratoderma

    Palmoplantar keratodermas are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormal thickening of the palms and soles. Autosomal recessive and dominant, X-linked, and acquired forms have all been described.

  • Pressure ulcer

    serch.it?q=Pressure-ulcer

    Pressure ulcers, also known as pressure sores, decubitus ulcers, and bedsores, and now referred to as pressure injuries are localized damage to the skin and/or underlying tissue that usually occur over a bony prominence as a result of pressure or pressure in combination with shear and/or friction. The most common sites are the skin overlying the sacrum, coccyx, heels or the hips, but other sites such as the elbows, knees, ankles, back of shoulders, or the back of the cranium can be affected. Pressure ulcers occur due to pressure applied to soft tissue resulting in completely or partially obstructed blood flow to the soft tissue. Shear is also a cause, as it can pull on blood vessels that feed the skin. Pressure ulcers most commonly develop in individuals who are not moving about, such as those being bedridden or confined to a wheelchair. It is widely believed that other factors can influence the tolerance of skin for pressure and shear, thereby increasing the risk of pressure ulcer development.

Map Box 1