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  • Killing of Harambe

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    On May 28, 2016, a three-year-old boy climbed into a gorilla enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden and was grabbed and dragged by Harambe, a 17-year-old Western lowland gorilla. Fearing for the boy's life, a zoo worker shot and killed Harambe. The incident was recorded on video and received broad international coverage and commentary, including controversy over the choice to kill Harambe. A number of primatologists and conservationists wrote later that the zoo had no other choice under the circumstances, and that it highlighted the danger of zoo animals in close proximity to humans and the need for better standards of care.

  • List of zoos in the United States

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    This is an incomplete list of existing, reputable zoos in the United States. For a list of aquaria, see List of aquaria in the United States, and for a list of nature centers, see List of nature centers in the United States. Zoos are primarily terrestrial facilities where animals are held in enclosures and displayed to the public for education and entertainment. Animals may be bred, as well, to maintain captive populations and kept under veterinary care. These facilities include zoos, safari parks, animal theme parks, aviaries, butterfly zoos, reptile centers, and petting zoos, as well as wildlife sanctuaries and nature reserves where visitors are allowed. Zoos in the United States show great diversity in both size and collection. Many are notable for ongoing global wildlife conservation and captive breeding efforts, especially for endangered animal species.

  • Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden

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    The Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden is the second-oldest zoo in the United States, opening in 1875, just 14 months after the Philadelphia Zoo opened on July 1, 1874. It is located in the Avondale neighborhood of Cincinnati, Ohio. It originally began with 64.5 acres (26.5 ha) in the middle of the city, but has spread into the neighboring blocks and several reserves in Cincinnati's outer suburbs. It was appointed as a National Historic Landmark in 1987. The zoo houses over 500 animals and 3,000 plant species. In addition, the zoo also has conducted several breeding programs in its history, and was the first to successfully breed California sea lions. In 1986, the Lindner Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife (CREW) was created to further the zoo's goal of conservation. The zoo is known for being the home of Martha, the last living passenger pigeon, and to Incas, the last living Carolina parakeet. The zoo is an accredited member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), and a member of the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA). A 2014 ranking of the nations's best zoos by USA Today based on data provided by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums lists the Cincinnati Zoo among the best in the country.

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