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  • DMC DeLorean

    serch.it?q=DMC-DeLorean

  • Steering wheel

    serch.it?q=Steering-wheel

    Passenger car steering wheels from different periods Steering wheel and front wheels of a farm tractor Steering wheel in a VDL Bova bus A steering wheel (also called a driving wheel or a hand wheel) is a type of steering control in vehicles and vessels (ships and boats). Steering wheels are used in most modern land vehicles, including all mass-production automobiles, as well as buses, light and heavy trucks, and tractors. The steering wheel is the part of the steering system that is manipulated by the driver; the rest of the steering system responds to such driver inputs. This can be through direct mechanical contact as in recirculating ball or rack and pinion steering gears, without or with the assistance of hydraulic power steering, HPS, or as in some modern production cars with the assistance of computer-controlled motors, known as Electric Power Steering.

  • Green eyeshade

    serch.it?q=Green-eyeshade

    EyeshadesGreen eyeshades are a type of visor that were worn most often from the late-19th century to the mid-20th century by accountants, telegraphers, copy editors and others engaged in vision-intensive, detail-oriented occupations to lessen eyestrain due to early incandescent lights and candles, which tended to be harsh (the classic banker's lamp had a green shade for similar reasons). Because they were often worn by people involved in accounting, auditing, economics, and budgeting, they became associated with these activities. Green eyeshades were often made of a transparent dark green or blue-green colored celluloid, although leather and paper were used to make the visor portion as well. One manufacturer, The Featherweight Eyeshade Company, described their eyeshade as "healthful, color peculiarly restful to the eyes". Green eyeshades are still on the market, typically sold as "dealer's visors". They retain a certain degree of popularity in the gambling community. Several individuals, including William Mahony, received patents for their eyeshade designs.

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