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  • Jacobaea vulgaris

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    Jacobaea vulgaris, syn. Senecio jacobaea, is a very common wild flower in the family Asteraceae that is native to northern Eurasia, usually in dry, open places, and has also been widely distributed as a weed elsewhere. Common names include ragwort, common ragwort, stinking willie, tansy ragwort, benweed, St. James-wort, stinking nanny/ninny/willy, staggerwort, dog standard, cankerwort, stammerwort. In the western United States it is generally known as tansy ragwort, or tansy, though its resemblance to the true tansy is superficial. Although the plant is often unwanted by landowners because it is considered a weed by many, it provides a great deal of nectar for pollinators. It was rated in the top 10 for most nectar production (nectar per unit cover per year) in a UK plants survey conducted by the AgriLand project which is supported by the UK Insect Pollinators Initiative. It also was the top producer of nectar sugar in another study in Britain, with a production per floral unit of (2921 ± 448μg).

  • Theobromine poisoning

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    Animal Oral toxicity (mg/kg) TDLo Cat 200 Dog 16 300 Human 26 ~1,000 Mouse 837 Rat 1,265Structure of theobromine (IUPAC name: 3,7-dimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-dione)Theobromine poisoning, also incorrectly called chocolate poisoning, is an overdosage reaction to the xanthine alkaloid theobromine, found in chocolate, tea, cola beverages, and some other foods. Median lethal () doses of theobromine have only been published for cats, dogs, rats, and mice; these differ by a factor of 6 across species. At doses of 0.8-1.5 g (50-100 g cocoa) per day sweating, trembling and severe headaches were noted. Limited mood effects were shown at 250mg/day and negative mood effects above.

  • List of poisonous plants

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    Australia, 1907: cattlemen survey 700 carcasses of cattle that were killed overnight by a poisonous plant Poisonous plants are those plants that produce toxins that deter herbivores from consuming them. Plants cannot move to escape their predators, so they must have other means of protecting themselves from herbivorous animals. Some plants have physical defenses such as thorns, spines and prickles, but by far the most common type of protection is chemical. Over millennia, through the process of natural selection, plants have evolved the means to produce a vast and complicated array of chemical compounds in order to deter herbivores. Tannin, for example, is a defensive compound that emerged relatively early in the evolutionary history of plants, while more complex molecules such as polyacetylenes are found in younger groups of plants such as the Asterales. Many of the known plant defense compounds primarily defend against consumption by insects, though other animals, including humans, that consume such plants may also experience negative effects, ranging from mild discomfort to death. Many of these poisonous compounds also have important medicinal benefits.

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