Web Results
Content Results
  • Mail

    serch.it?q=Mail

    A universal symbol of mail – an envelope A USPS mail truck in the United States The mail or post is a system for physically transporting postcards, letters, and parcels. A postal service can be private or public, though many governments place restrictions on private systems. Since the mid-19th century, national postal systems have generally been established as government monopolies, with a fee on the article prepaid. Proof of payment is often in the form of adhesive postage stamps, but postage meters are also used for bulk mailing. Modern private postal systems are typically distinguished from national postal agencies by the names "courier" or "delivery service". Postal authorities often have functions other than transporting letters. In some countries, a postal, telegraph and telephone (PTT) service oversees the postal system, in addition to telephone and telegraph systems. Some countries' postal systems allow for savings accounts and handle applications for passports. The Universal Postal Union (UPU), established in 1874, includes 192 member countries and sets the rules for international mail exchanges.

  • American Letter Mail Company

    serch.it?q=American-Letter-Mail-Company

    The American Letter Mail Company was started by Lysander Spooner in 1844, competing with the presumed legal monopoly of the United States Post Office (USPO, now the USPS). Spooner started the service out of frustration with the exceedingly high postal rates. It cost 18 3/4 cents to send a letter from Boston to New York and 25 cents to send one all the way to Washington DC. A letter sent from Boston to Albany, NY written on a 1/4-ounce sheet of paper and carried by the Western Railroad, cost 2/3 as much as the freight charge for carrying a barrel of flour the same distance. Spooner's justification was that the Constitution provided for a government-run postal service, but did not exclude others from engaging in the same business, but Spooner dropped his rates even lower -- delivering many letters for free. Competition dropped prices dramatically. Postage 6 1/4 cents per each half-ounce, payable in advance always. Stamps 20 for a dollar. Deliveries were made twice daily between New York City and Philadelphia. The US Government tried to lower prices by threatening railroads to withdraw business. However, the U.S. Government challenged Spooner with legal measures whereby Spooner was initially vindicated. in fact the U.S. Circuit Court expressed doubt that the U.S. had the right to monopolize the transportation of mail. Congress eventually forced him to cease operations in 1851 by legislating a US monopoly.

  • Postal holiday

    serch.it?q=Postal-holiday

    In the United States, a Postal holiday is a Federal holiday recognized by the United States Postal Service, during which no mail is delivered. Though letter carriers have the day off, some postal workers are forced to work on holidays, such as clerks dispatching mail, or those working in plant distribution facilities. Some plant facilities operate 365 days a year. Part 608, section 3.2 of the DMM (U.S. Domestic Mail Manual) groups holidays into "Widely Observed" and "Not Widely Observed". Holidays "Widely Observed" include New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Veteran’s day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. Holidays "Not Widely Observed" are Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Birthday; Presidents Day; Columbus Day; and Veterans Day. If a holiday occurs on Sunday, service will be observed on Monday.

Map Box 1