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  • Subspecialty

    serch.it?q=Subspecialty

    A subspecialty or subspeciality (British English) is a narrow field within a specialty such as forensic pathology, which is a subspecialty of anatomical pathology. A subspecialist is a specialist of a subspecialty. In medicine, subspecialization is particularly common in internal medicine, cardiology, and neurology, and has grown as medicine has: become more complex, and it has become clear that a physician's case volume is negatively associated with their complication rate; that is, complications tend to decrease as the volume of cases per physician goes up.

  • Emergency physician

    serch.it?q=Emergency-physician

    An emergency physician is a physician who works at an emergency department to care for ill patients. The emergency physician is a specialist in advanced cardiac life support (advanced life support in Europe), resuscitation, trauma care such as fractures and soft tissue injuries, and management of other life-threatening situations. In some European countries (e.g. Germany, Belgium, Poland, Austria and Denmark), emergency physicians/anaesthetists are also part of the emergency medical service and are dispatched together with EMTs and paramedics in cases of potentially life-threatening situations for patients (heart attacks, serious accidents, resuscitations or unconsciousness, strokes, drug overdoses, etc.). An emergency physician is a "Jack of all trades". In the United States, emergency physicians are mostly hospital-based, but they often work on air ambulances and mobile intensive-care units. When a patient is brought into the emergency department, he or she is usually sent to triage first. The patient may be triaged by an emergency physician, a paramedic, or a nurse; in the United States, triage is usually performed by a registered nurse. If the patient is admitted to the hospital, another physician such as a cardiologist or neurologist takes over from the emergency physician.

  • Residency (medicine)

    serch.it?q=Residency-(medicine)

    Anesthesia residents being led through training with a patient simulatorResidency or postgraduate training is a stage of graduate medical education. It refers to a qualified physician, podiatrist, or dentist (one who holds the degree of MD, DPM, DDS, DMD, DO or MB; BS, MBChB, or BMed, BDS, BDent) who practises medicine, usually in a hospital or clinic, under the direct or indirect supervision of a senior clinician registered in that specialty such as an attending physician or consultant. In many jurisdictions, successful completion of such training is a requirement in order to obtain an unrestricted license to practise medicine, and in particular a license to practise a chosen specialty. An individual engaged in such training may be referred to as a resident, house officer, registrar or trainee depending on the jurisdiction. Residency training may be followed by fellowship or sub-specialty training. Whereas medical school teaches physicians a broad range of medical knowledge, basic clinical skills, and supervised experience practicing medicine in a variety of fields, medical residency gives in-depth training within a specific branch of medicine.

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