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  • Dodge

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    Dodge is an American brand of automobile manufactured by FCA US LLC (formerly known as Chrysler Group LLC), based in Auburn Hills, Michigan. Dodge vehicles currently include the lower-priced badge variants of Chrysler-badged vehicles as well as performance cars, though for much of its existence Dodge was Chrysler's mid-priced brand above Plymouth. Founded as the Dodge Brothers Company machine shop by brothers Horace Elgin Dodge and John Francis Dodge in the early 1900s, Dodge was originally a supplier of parts and assemblies for Detroit-based automakers and began building complete automobiles under the "Dodge Brothers" brand in 1914, predating the founding of Chrysler Corporation. The factory was located in Hamtramck, Michigan, and was called the Dodge Main factory from 1910 until its closing in January 1980. The Dodge brothers both died in 1920, and the company was sold by their families to Dillon, Read & Co. in 1925 before being sold to Chrysler in 1928. Dodge vehicles mainly consisted of trucks and full-sized passenger cars through the 1970s, though it made memorable compact cars (such as the 1963–76 Dart) and midsize cars (such as the "B-Body" Coronet and Charger from 1962–79).

  • Dodge C series

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    The C series was a line of pickup trucks sold by Dodge from 1954 to 1960. It replaced the Dodge B series of trucks and was eventually supplanted by the Dodge D series, introduced in 1961. Unlike the B series, which were closely related to Dodge's prewar trucks, the C series was a complete redesign. Dodge continued the "pilot house" tradition of high-visibility cabs with a wraparound windshield introduced in 1955. A two-speed "PowerFlite" automatic transmission was newly available that year. Chrysler called the Hemi-powered Dodge trucks "Power Giant" in 1957, and introduced power steering and brakes, a three-speed automatic, and a 12-volt electrical system. From 1957 to 1959, Dodge proposed the Sweptside pickup, a rival to the Chevrolet Cameo Carrier, but it never became a best-seller. A flat-sided (and thus wider) "Sweptline" cargo box came in 1959. The company also adopted the standard pickup truck numbering scheme, also used by Ford and GM at that time. Thus, the ½ ton Dodge was now called the D100. A traditional separate-fender body "Utiline" version was also built which had a GVWR of . Engines (light-duty): 1957-1960; Flathead I6, 1959; 331 in³ FirePower V8, 1957-1959; 315 in³ Red Ram V8, 1959; 318 in³ A-type V8, 1954-55 Dodge C-Series.jpg|1954–56 model 1957 Dodge Sweptside Pickup.jpg|1957 model (Sweptside pickup) 1960 Dodge Sweptline half ton (2906406858).jpg|1958–60 model

  • Fargo Trucks

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    1942 Fargo trucks ranged from light to heavy-duty, in 68 variants on 12 wheelbase lengths (Canada). 1946 Fargo FK2-33 badged version of the Dodge T-, V-, W-Series Australian Fargo De Luxe Utility Power Wagon truck in Batey ha-Osef Museum, IsraelFargo was a brand of truck originally produced in the United States in 1913 by the Fargo Motor Car Company. Dropped in 1922, the name was reintroduced for a line of trucks manufactured by the Chrysler Corporation after purchasing Fargo Motors in 1928. Later, Chrysler absorbed Dodge and started producing its truck line, so over time Fargo trucks became rebadged Dodges, similar to the parallel sale by General Motors of its GMC and Chevrolet truck lines. The modern-day descendant of Chrysler's truck division is now known as Ram Trucks.

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