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  • Service (motor vehicle)

    serch.it?q=Service-(motor-vehicle)

    repair shop A motor vehicle service or tune-up is a series of maintenance procedures carried out at a set time interval or after the vehicle has travelled a certain distance. The service intervals are specified by the vehicle manufacturer in a service schedule and some modern cars display the due date for the next service electronically on the instrument panel. A tune-up should not be confused with engine tuning, which is the modifying of an engine to perform better than the original specification, rather than using maintenance to keep the engine running as it should. The completed services are usually recorded in a service book which is rubber-stamped by the service centre upon completion of each service. A complete service history usually adds to the resale value of a vehicle.

  • Break-in (mechanical run-in)

    serch.it?q=Break-in-(mechanical-run-in)

    Break-in or breaking in, also known as run-in or running in, is the procedure of conditioning a new piece of equipment by giving it an initial period of running, usually under light load, but sometimes under heavy load or normal load. It is generally a process of moving parts wearing against each other to produce the last small bit of size and shape adjustment that will settle them into a stable relationship for the rest of their working life. One of the most common examples of break-in is engine break-in for petrol engines and diesel engines.

  • Check engine light

    serch.it?q=Check-engine-light

    Malfunction Indicator Icon A Malfunction Indicator Lamp, this one labeled "Service Engine Soon". A MIL "Check Engine" light on a Volkswagen Bora indicating a fault in the Engine Management System. MIL on a running engine indicating malfunction in engine control system. A malfunction indicator lamp (MIL), or check engine light, is a tell-tale that a computerized engine-management system uses to indicate a malfunction. Found on the instrument panel of most automobiles, it usually bears the legend , , or a pictogram of an engine - and when illuminated it is typically either an amber or red color. The light generally has two stages: steady (indicating a minor fault) and flashing (indicating a severe fault). When the MIL is lit, the engine control unit stores a fault code related to the malfunction, which can be retrieved - although in many models this requires the use of a scan tool. This warning light can indicate almost anything from a loose gas cap to a serious knock in the engine. In the United States, specific functions are required of the MIL by EPA regulations.

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