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  • Engine stand

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    An engine stand is a tool commonly used to repair large heavy gasoline or diesel engines. It uses a heavy cantilevered support structure to hold the engine in midair so that the mechanic has access to any exposed surface of the engine. While small single-piston engines can commonly be laid on a table for repair, a large engine is normally meant to be supported from its engine mounts or from the flywheel transmission case mounts, and fragile components such as oil pans and valve covers would be crushed if the large engine were placed on a flat surface. Engine stands are typically mounted on large casters so than an engine can be moved around the shop to different test and repair stations, and the engine can often be rotated in midair to provide easier access to underside surfaces of the engine. The engine stand is commonly used in combination with the engine crane to remove or install an engine in a vehicle, break in that engine, and perform repairs.

  • TDI (engine)

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  • Diesel engine

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    Diesel generator on an oil tanker The diesel engine (also known as a compression-ignition or CI engine), named after Rudolf Diesel, is an internal combustion engine in which ignition of the fuel, which is injected into the combustion chamber, is caused by the elevated temperature of the air in the cylinder due to the mechanical compression (adiabatic compression). Diesel engines work by compressing only the air. This increases the air temperature inside the cylinder to such a high degree that atomised diesel fuel injected into the combustion chamber ignites spontaneously. This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. In diesel engines, glow plugs (combustion chamber pre-warmers) may be used to aid starting in cold weather, or when the engine uses a lower compression-ratio, or both. The original diesel engine operates on the "constant pressure" cycle of gradual combustion and produces no audible knock.

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