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  • Résumé

    serch.it?q=Résumé

    Sample résumé outline for a college student A résumé or resume is a document used by a person to present their backgrounds and skills. Résumés can be used for a variety of reasons, but most often they are used to secure new employment. A typical résumé contains a "summary" of relevant job experience and education. The résumé is usually one of the first items, along with a cover letter and sometimes an application for employment, which a potential employer sees regarding the job seeker and is typically used to screen applicants, often followed by an interview. The curriculum vitae (CV) used for employment purposes in the UK (and in other European countries) is more akin to the résumé—a shorter, summary version of one's education and experience—than to the longer and more detailed CV that is expected in U.S. academic circles. Generally, the résumé is substantially shorter than a CV in English Canada, the U.S. and Australia. In South Asian countries such as India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, biodata is often used in place of a résumé.

  • Curriculum vitae

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    Example of a CV. A curriculum vitae () (often shortened CV, résumé or vita) is a written overview of a person's experience and other qualifications for a job opportunity. It is akin to a résumé in North America. In some countries, a CV is typically the first item that a potential employer encounters regarding the job seeker and is typically used to screen applicants, often followed by an interview. CVs may also be requested for applicants to postsecondary programs, scholarships, grants and bursaries. In the 2010s, some applicants provide an electronic text of their CV to employers using email, an online employment website or using a job-oriented social-networking-service website, such as LinkedIn.

  • Situation, task, action, result

    serch.it?q=Situation,-task,-action,-result

    The situation, task, action, result (STAR) format is a used by interviewers to gather all the relevant information about a specific capability that the job requires. Situation: The interviewer wants you to present a recent challenge and situation in which you found yourself. Task: What were you required to achieve? The interviewer will be looking to see what you were trying to achieve from the situation. Some performance development methods use “Target” rather than “Task”. Job interview candidates who describe a “Target” they set themselves instead of an externally imposed “Task” emphasize their own intrinsic motivation to perform and to develop their performance. Action: What did you do? The interviewer will be looking for information on what you did, why you did it and what the alternatives were. Results: What was the outcome of your actions? What did you achieve through your actions and did you meet your objectives? What did you learn from this experience and have you used this learning since?The STAR technique is similar to the SOARA technique.

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