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  • Rabeprazole

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    Rabeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor that suppresses gastric acid production in the stomach. It has several medical uses: the management of conditions that involve excess gastric acid production (e.g. Zollinger–Ellison syndrome), conditions that are worsened by gastric acid (e.g. ulcerations of the gastrointestinal tract), and conditions involving prolonged exposure to gastric acid (e.g. symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease). Rabeprazole's adverse effects tend to be mild but can be serious, including deficiencies in essential nutrients, rare incidences of liver and bone damage, and dangerous rashes. Rabeprazole can theoretically contribute to numerous drug interactions, mediated both through its metabolic properties and its direct effect on acid in the stomach, though its potential for clinically meaningful drug interactions is low. Like other medications in the proton pump inhibitor class, rabeprazole's mechanism of action involves the permanent inhibition of proton pumps in the stomach, which are responsible for gastric acid production. Rabeprazole has a number of chemical metabolites, though it is primarily degraded by non-enzymatic metabolism and excreted in the urine. Genetic differences in a person's drug-metabolizing enzymes may affect a person's response to rabeprazole therapy, though this is unlikely in comparison to other proton pump inhibitors. Rabeprazole is marketed around in the world in a variety of combinations and brand name products.

  • Lansoprazole

    serch.it?q=Lansoprazole

    Lansoprazole, sold under the brand name Prevacid among others, is a medication which inhibits the stomach's production of gastric acid. There is no evidence that its effectiveness is different from that of other PPIs. Lansoprazole, given through a nasogastric tube, effectively controls pH inside the stomach and is an alternative to intravenous pantoprazole in people who are unable to swallow solid-dose formulations. Lansoprazole is a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) in the same pharmacologic class as omeprazole. Lansoprazole has been marketed for many years and is one of several PPIs available. It is a racemic 1:1 mixture of the enantiomers dexlansoprazole (Dexilant, formerly named Kapidex) and levolansoprazole. Dexlansoprazole is an enantiomerically pure active ingredient of a commercial drug as a result of the enantiomeric shift. Lansoprazole's plasma elimination half-life (1.5 h) is not proportional to the duration of the drug's effects to the person (i.e. gastric acid suppression). The effects of the medication last for over 24 hours after it has been used for a day or more. It is manufactured by a number of companies worldwide under several brand names. In the United States, it was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1995. Prevacid patent protection expired on November 10, 2009.

  • Doxepin

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    Doxepin is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) used to treat major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and chronic hives, and for short-term help with trouble remaining asleep after going to bed (a form of insomnia). As a cream it is used for short term treatment of itchiness due to atopic dermatitis or lichen simplex chronicus. At doses used to treat depression, doxepin appears to inhibit the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine and to have antihistamine, adrenergic and serotonin receptor antagonistic, and anticholinergic activities; at low doses used to treat insomnia it appears to be selective for the histamine H1 receptor. It was introduced under the brand names Quitaxon and Aponal by Boehringer, which discovered it, and as Sinequan by Pfizer, and has subsequently been marketed under many other names worldwide.

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