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  • Bland diet

    serch.it?q=Bland-diet

    A bland diet is a diet consisting of foods that are generally soft, low in dietary fiber, cooked rather than raw, and not spicy. Fried and fatty foods, strong cheeses, whole grains (rich in fiber), and the medications aspirin and ibuprofen are also avoided while on this diet. Such a diet is called bland because it is soothing to the digestive tract (it minimizes irritation of tissues). It can also be bland in the sense of "lacking flavor", but it does not always have to be so; nonirritating food can be appetizing food, depending on preparation and individual preferences.

  • Indigestion

    serch.it?q=Indigestion

    Indigestion, also known as dyspepsia, is a condition of impaired digestion. Symptoms may include upper abdominal fullness, heartburn, nausea, belching, or upper abdominal pain. People may also experience feeling full earlier than expected when eating. Dyspepsia is a common problem and is frequently caused by gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or gastritis. In a small minority of cases it may be the first symptom of peptic ulcer disease (an ulcer of the stomach or duodenum) and, occasionally, cancer. Hence, unexplained newly onset dyspepsia in people over 55 or the presence of other alarming symptoms may require further investigations. Functional indigestion (previously called nonulcer dyspepsia) is indigestion "without evidence of an organic disease that is likely to explain the symptoms". Functional indigestion is estimated to affect about 15% of the general population in western countries.

  • BRAT diet

    serch.it?q=BRAT-diet

    The BRAT diet is a diet that has been recommended for people with vomiting, diarrhea or gastroenteritis. Evidence, however, does not support a benefit. It is no longer generally recommended as it is unnecessarily restrictive. An acronym, BRAT is a mnemonic for bananas, rice, apple sauce, and toast, the staples of the diet. It is recommended that all people, regardless of age, drink plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration, along with oral rehydration solutions to replace the depleted electrolytes to avoid salt imbalance. Severe, untreated salt imbalance can result in "extreme weakness, confusion, coma, or death." The diet was first discussed in 1926.

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