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  • List of car-free places

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    The main square of Siena, Italy The areas in this list of car-free places make up a sizeable fraction of a city, town, or island; public transport connections do not in themselves constitute a car free area. Color-coding is used as follows: Place name Most or all of the area is essentially car free Place name Large area that is nearly car free Place name A limited number of vehicles intrude

  • Passenger vehicles in the United States

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    Note: this article adopts the U.S. Department of Transportation's definition of a passenger vehicle, to mean a car or truck, used for passengers, excluding buses and trains. Since 2009 the United States is home to the second largest passenger vehicle market of any country in the world, second to China. Overall, there were an estimated 263.6 million registered vehicles in the United States in 2015, most of which were passenger vehicles. This number, along with the average age of vehicles, has increased steadily since 1960. The United States is also home to three large vehicle manufacturers: General Motors, Ford Motor Company, and Chrysler, which have historically been referred to as the "Big Three".

  • Car-Free Days

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    Brussels Car Free Day, 2005. The Bois de La Cambre Car-Free Days, 2015. Jakarta weekly Car Free Day, 2010.World Car Free Day, which is celebrated on September 22, encourages motorists to give up their cars for a day. Organized events are held in some cities and countries. According to The Washington Post, the event "promotes improvement of mass transit, cycling and walking, and the development of communities where jobs are closer to home and where shopping is within walking distance". Studies showed that for short trips in cities, one can reach more quickly using a bicycle rather than using a car. The events, which vary by location, give motorists and commuters an idea of their locality with fewer cars. While projects along these lines had taken place from time to time on an ad hoc basis starting with the 1973 oil crisis, it was only in October 1994 that a structured call for such projects was issued in a keynote speech by Eric Britton at the International Ciudades Accessibles (Accessible Cities) Conference held in Toledo (Spain).

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