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  • Multi-axle bus

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    A tri axle coach, the Neoplan Skyliner A multi-axle bus is a bus or coach that has more than the conventional two axles (known as a twin-axle bus), usually three (known as a tri-axle bus), or more rarely, four (known as a quad-axle bus). Extra axles are usually added for legal weight restriction reasons, or to accommodate different vehicle designs such as articulation, or rarely, to implement trailer buses.

  • Trailer bus

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    Bus trailer Karosa NO 80 exhibited in Prague A shuttle bus service consisting of a trailer bus being pulled by a conventional bus at Zion National Park. It remains as one of the few examples of trailer buses still being used in service today A Hino Ranger Trailer bus in Japan Camel bus in Havana A trailer bus or articulated trailer bus is a bus formed out of a bus bodied semi-trailer pulled by a conventional tractor unit in the same way as a conventional articulated semi-trailer truck. Trailer buses are usually pulled by a conventional truck from various truck manufacturers, while others have larger space cabs. Trailer bus bodies are built by various local builders.

  • Ford L series

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    The Ford L series (also named Ford Louisville or, for the 1988+ aerodynamic models, Ford Aeromax) is a range of heavy-duty trucks that were assembled and marketed by Ford between 1970 and 1998. The first dedicated Class 8 truck produced by the company, the L-series range replaced the N-series short conventional (derived from the F series). Produced as both straight trucks and semitractors, the Ford L series encompassed a wide range of models through the Class 7-8 GVWR ratings in medium-duty, severe-service, and vocational applications. The line would become one of the most popular series of trucks Ford ever produced. The L series was produced in the Kentucky Truck Plant near Louisville, Kentucky, which gave rise to the nickname "Louisville Line" trucks; as part of a 1996 redesign, part of the model line officially took on the Louisville nameplate. Following the sale of the Ford heavy-truck line to Freightliner in 1996, the L series was discontinued by Ford at the end of 1998.

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