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  • Sushi

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    is a Japanese dish of specially prepared , usually with some sugar and salt, combined with a variety of , such as seafood, vegetables, and occasionally tropical fruits. Styles of sushi and its presentation vary widely, but the key ingredient is "sushi rice", also referred to as , or . The term sushi is no longer used in its original context and literally means "sour-tasting". Sushi is traditionally made with medium-grain white rice, though it can be prepared with brown rice. It is often prepared with seafood, such as calamari, eel, or imitation crab meat. Many others are vegetarian. Sushi is often served with pickled ginger (gari), wasabi, and soy sauce. Daikon radish is popular as a garnish. Sushi is sometimes confused with sashimi, a related Japanese dish consisting of thinly sliced raw fish, or occasionally meat, and an optional serving of rice.

  • List of French dishes

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    There are many dishes considered part of French cuisine. Some dishes are considered universally accepted as part of the national cuisine, while others fit into a unique regional cuisine. There are also breads, charcuterie items as well as desserts that fit into these categories which are listed accordingly as well.

  • Tlingit cuisine

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    The food of the Tlingit people, an indigenous people from Alaska, British Columbia, and the Yukon, is a central part of Tlingit culture, and the land is an abundant provider. A saying amongst the Tlingit is that "When the tide goes out the table is set." This refers to the richness of intertidal life found on the beaches of Southeast Alaska, most of which can be harvested for food. Another saying is that "in Lingít Aaní you have to be an idiot to starve". Since food is so easy to gather from the beaches, a person who can't feed himself at least enough to stay alive is considered a fool, perhaps mentally incompetent or suffering from very bad luck. Though eating off the beach could provide a fairly healthy and varied diet, eating nothing but "beach food" is considered contemptible among the Tlingit, and a sign of poverty. Shamans and their families were required to abstain from all food gathered from the beach, and men might avoid eating beach food before battles or strenuous activities in the belief that it would weaken them spiritually and perhaps physically as well.

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