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  • Gross value added

    serch.it?q=Gross-value-added

    In economics, gross value added (GVA) is the measure of the value of goods and services produced in an area, industry or sector of an economy. In national accounts GVA is output minus intermediate consumption; it is a balancing item of the national accounts' production account.

  • Gross private domestic investment

    serch.it?q=Gross-private-domestic-investment

    Gross private domestic investment is the measure of physical investment used in computing GDP in the measurement of nations' economic activity. This is an important component of GDP because it provides an indicator of the future productive capacity of the economy. It includes replacement purchases plus net additions to capital assets plus investments in inventories. From 2002-2011 it amounted to 14.9% of US GDP, and from 1945-2011 was 15.7% of GDP (BEA, USDC, 2013). Net investment is gross investment minus depreciation. Of the four categories of GDP (investment, consumption, net exports, and government spending on goods and services) it is by far the least stable. Gross private domestic investment includes 3 types of investment: Non-residential investment: Expenditures by firms on capital such as tools, machinery, and factories. Residential Investment: Expenditures on residential structures and residential equipment that is owned by landlords and rented to tenants. Change in inventories (or stocks): The change of firm inventories in a given period. (Inventory or stock is the goods that are produced by firms but kept to be sold later.)

  • Gross domestic product

    serch.it?q=Gross-domestic-product

    A map of world economies by size of GDP (nominal) in USD, World Bank, 2014Gross domestic product (GDP) is a monetary measure of the market value of all the final goods and services produced in a period of time, often annually or quarterly. Nominal GDP estimates are commonly used to determine the economic performance of a whole country or region, and to make international comparisons. GDP (nominal) per capita does not, however, reflect differences in the cost of living and the inflation rates of the countries; therefore using a basis of GDP per capita at purchasing power parity (PPP) is arguably more useful when comparing differences in living standards between nations.

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