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  • Fungus gnat

    serch.it?q=Fungus-gnat

    SciaridaeFungus gnats are small, dark, short-lived gnats, of the families Sciaridae, Diadocidiidae, Ditomyiidae, Keroplatidae, Bolitophilidae, and Mycetophilidae (order Diptera); they comprise six of the seven families placed in the superfamily Sciaroidea.

  • Sciaridae

    serch.it?q=Sciaridae

    A sciarid ovipositing into a leaf of Urtica The Sciaridae are a family of flies, commonly known as dark-winged fungus gnats. Commonly found in moist environments, they are known to be a pest of mushroom farms and are commonly found in household plant pots. This is one of the least studied of the large Diptera families, probably due to the small size of these insects and the difficulty in specific identification. Currently, around 1700 species are described, but an estimated 20,000 species are awaiting discovery, mainly in the tropics. More than 600 species are known from Europe.

  • Gnat

    serch.it?q=Gnat

    Gnat from Robert Hooke's Micrographia, 1665 A female black fungus gnat A gnat is any of many species of tiny flying insects in the dipterid suborder Nematocera, especially those in the families Mycetophilidae, Anisopodidae and Sciaridae. They can be both biting and non-biting. Most often they fly in large numbers, called clouds. "Gnat" is a loose descriptive category rather than a phylogenetic or other technical term, so there is no scientific consensus on what constitutes a gnat. University of Kentucky entomologists consider only non-biting flies to be gnats, and the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln classifies fungus gnats and other non-biting flies as gnats. Certain universities also distinguish eye gnats: the Smithsonian Institution describes them as "non-biting flies, no bigger than a few grains of salt, ... attracted to fluids secreted by your eyes".

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