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  • Fine-needle aspiration

    serch.it?q=Fine-needle-aspiration

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is a diagnostic procedure used to investigate lumps or masses. In this technique, a thin (23–25 gauge), hollow needle is inserted into the mass for sampling of cells that, after being stained, will be examined under a microscope (biopsy). The sampling and biopsy considered together are called fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) or fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) (the latter to emphasize that any aspiration biopsy involves cytopathology not histopathology). Fine-needle aspiration biopsies are very safe, minor surgical procedures. Often, a major surgical (excisional or open) biopsy can be avoided by performing a needle aspiration biopsy instead, eliminating the need for hospitalization. In 1981, the first fine-needle aspiration biopsy in the United States was done at Maimonides Medical Center. Today, this procedure is widely used in the diagnosis of cancer and inflammatory conditions. A needle aspiration biopsy is safer and less traumatic than an open surgical biopsy, and significant complications are usually rare, depending on the body site. Common complications include bruising and soreness.

  • Rheumatoid lung disease

    serch.it?q=Rheumatoid-lung-disease

    Rheumatoid Lung Disease, also called Rheumatoid Lung is a disease of the lung associated with RA, rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid lung disease is characterized by pleural effusion, pulmonary fibrosis, lung nodules and pulmonary hypertension. Common symptoms associated with the disease include shortness of breath, cough, chest pain and fever. It is estimated that about one quarter of people with rheumatoid arthritis develop this disease, which are more likely to develop among elderly men with a history of smoking. Rheumatoid lung is separate from but often associated with Interstitial lung disease(ILD).

  • Lung biopsy

    serch.it?q=Lung-biopsy

    A lung biopsy is an interventional procedure performed to diagnose lung pathology by obtaining a small piece of lung which is examined under a microscope. Beyond microscopic examination for cellular morphology and architecture, special stains and cultures can be performed on the tissue obtained. A lung biopsy can be performed percutaneously (through the skin, typically guided by a CT Scan), via bronchoscopy with ultrasound guidance, or by surgery, either open or by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS).

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