Web Results
Content Results
  • Pelvic floor

    serch.it?q=Pelvic-floor

    The pelvic floor or pelvic diaphragm is composed of muscle fibers of the levator ani, the coccygeus muscle, and associated connective tissue which span the area underneath the pelvis. The pelvic diaphragm is a muscular partition formed by the levatores ani and coccygei, with which may be included the parietal pelvic fascia on their upper and lower aspects. The pelvic floor separates the pelvic cavity above from the perineal region (including perineum) below. Because, to accommodate the birth canal, a female's pelvic cavity is larger than a male's, the pelvic floor tends to be considered a part of female anatomy, but males have an equivalent pelvic floor.

  • Bladder exstrophy

    serch.it?q=Bladder-exstrophy

    Bladder exstrophy (also known as ectopia vesicae) is a congenital anomaly that exists along the spectrum of the exstrophy-epispadias complex and most notably involves protrusion of the urinary bladder through a defect in the abdominal wall. Its presentation is variable, often including abnormalities of the bony pelvis, pelvic floor, and genitalia. The underlying embryologic mechanism leading to bladder exstrophy is unknown, though it is thought to be in part due to failed reinforcement of the cloacal membrane by underlying mesoderm. Exstrophy means the inversion of a hollow organ.

  • Pelvic organ prolapse

    serch.it?q=Pelvic-organ-prolapse

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is characterized by descent of pelvic organs from their normal positions. In women, the condition usually occurs when the pelvic floor collapses after gynecological cancer treatment, childbirth or heavy lifting. In men, it may occur after the prostate gland is removed. The injury occurs to fascia membranes and other connective structures that can result in cystocele, rectocele or both. Treatment can involve dietary and lifestyle changes, physical therapy, or surgery.

Map Box 1