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  • Kayak

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    Whitewater kayaker at Great Falls, Virginia, United States|alt=Man wearing helmet sitting in fiberglass boat, paddling through frothy water A kayak is a small, narrow watercraft which is propelled by means of a double-bladed paddle. The word kayak originates from the Greenlandic word qajaq (). The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. The cockpit is sometimes covered by a spray deck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray, differentiating the craft from a canoe. The spray deck makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler. Inuit seal hunter in a kayak, armed with a harpoon|alt=Man sitting with legs covered in boat that tapers to a point at each end holding long, pointed, wooden pole Interior 360 degree photosphere of a kayak at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian.

  • Outline of canoeing and kayaking

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    Kayakers view of Coniston Water, Cumbria The following outline is provided as an overview of canoeing and kayaking:Canoeing – recreational boating activity or paddle sport in which you kneel or sit facing forward in an open or closed-decked canoe, and propel yourself with a single-bladed paddle, under your own power.Kayaking – use of a kayak for moving across water. It is distinguished from canoeing by the sitting position of the paddler and the number of blades on the paddle. A kayak is a boat where the paddler faces forward, legs in front, using a double-bladed paddle. Most kayaks have closed decks.

  • Canoe

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    A B.N. Morris Canoe Company wood-and-canvas canoe built approximately 1912 Birchbark canoe at Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine Bark canoe in Australia, Howitt 1904 A canoe is a lightweight narrow vessel, typically pointed at both ends and open on top, propelled by one or more seated or kneeling paddlers facing the direction of travel using a single-bladed paddle. In British English, the term "canoe" can also refer to a kayak, while canoes are then called Canadian canoes to distinguish them from kayaks. Canoes are widely used for competition and pleasure, such as racing, whitewater, touring and camping, freestyle, and general recreation. Canoeing has been part of the Olympics since 1936. The intended use of the canoe dictates its hull shape and length and construction material. Historically, canoes were dugouts or made of bark on a wood frame, but construction materials evolved to canvas on a wood frame, then to aluminum. Most modern canoes are made of molded plastic or composites such as fiberglass. Canoes were developed by cultures all over the world, including some designed for use with sails or outriggers. Until the mid-1800s the canoe was an important means of transport for exploration and trade, and in some places it still is used as such, perhaps with the addition of an outboard motor. Where the canoe played a key role in history, such as the northern United States, Canada, and New Zealand, it remains an important theme in popular culture.

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