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  • Nashville Predators

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    The Nashville Predators are a professional ice hockey team based in Nashville, Tennessee. They are members of the Central Division of the Western Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL). The Predators' television broadcasting rights are held by Fox Sports Tennessee, whereas radio broadcasting rights are held by WPRT-FM. The Predators have played their home games at Bridgestone Arena since 1998. The club was founded in 1998 when the NHL granted an expansion franchise to Craig Leipold. After five seasons, the Predators qualified for their first Stanley Cup playoffs during the 2003–04 season. In 2008, ownership of the club was transferred from Leipold to a locally based ownership group. The Predators advanced to their first Stanley Cup Finals in 2017, but were defeated by the Pittsburgh Penguins in six games. In the following season, the Predators won their first Presidents' Trophy and Central Division title. The Predators are presently affiliated with one minor league team, the Milwaukee Admirals of the American Hockey League.

  • Nathan Bedford Forrest

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    Nathan Bedford Forrest (July 13, 1821 – October 29, 1877) was a Confederate Army general during the American Civil War. He was described by opposition Union Army General Sherman as one of the only two geniuses active in that conflict, the other being then-U.S. President Lincoln. Before the war, Forrest had amassed substantial wealth as a cotton planter, horse and cattle trader, real estate broker and slave trader. In June 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate Army, one of the few officers during the war to enlist as a private and be promoted general without any military training. An expert cavalry leader, Forrest was given command of a corps and established new doctrines for mobile forces, earning the nickname "The Wizard of the Saddle". His methods influenced many future generations of military strategists, although the Confederate high command is seen to have under-utilized his talents. Forrest's cavalry captured more Union guns, horses and supplies than any other single Confederate unit. He proved to be a belligerent opponent for both Union Generals Ulysses S. Grant and William T. Sherman. He played pivotal roles at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, the capture of Murfreesboro, the pursuit and capture of Colonel Abel Streight's Raiders, Brice's Crossroads and the Nashville Campaign. In April 1864, in what has been called "one of the bleakest, saddest events of American military history," troops under Forrest's command massacred Union troops who had surrendered, most of them black soldiers, along with some white Southern Tennesseans fighting for the Union, at the Battle of Fort Pillow. Forrest was blamed for the massacre in the Union press, and that news may have strengthened the North's resolve. In June, Forrest achieved a notable victory at Brice's Crossroads, but was followed by a Confederate defeat at Tupelo, in July, where he was wounded in battle. Forrest was in chief command of the cavalry during the Nashville Campaign. In February 1865, Forrest was promoted to Lieutenant General. After Robert E. Lee was defeated and surrendered to Grant at Appomattox, the war came to a conclusion. In May 1865, Forrest surrendered at Selma, was paroled, and he returned to his cotton plantations. During Reconstruction, Forrest's citizenship rights were restored with the pardon he received from President Andrew Johnson on July 17, 1868, but he never could escape the label of "Butcher of Fort Pillow". Forrest joined the Ku Klux Klan, apparently in 1867, two years after its founding and was elected its first Grand Wizard. The group was a loose collection of local groups that used the threat of violence to maintain white control over the newly enfranchised slaves. While Forrest was a leader, the Klan, during the Election of 1868, suppressed voting rights of blacks and Republicans in the South through intimidation. In 1869, Forrest expressed disillusionment with the lack of discipline among the various white supremacist groups across the South, and issued a letter ordering the dissolution of the Ku Klux Klan and its costumes to be destroyed and withdrew from the organization. Lacking coordinated leadership and facing strong prosecution by President Grant, the members of this first incarnation of the Klan absconded and it gradually disappeared. For a time after the war, Forrest operated a prison labor camp where prisoners, primarily black men arrested for "vagrancy" or other similar charges, had their involuntary labor auctioned to private bidders, to the benefit of the buyers and the prison officials. However, in the last years of his life, Forrest publicly denounced the violence and racism of the Klan, insisted he had never been a member and made at least one public speech (to a black audience) in favor of racial harmony. Although scholars admire Forrest as a military strategist, he has remained a highly controversial figure in Southern history, especially for his role in the attack on Fort Pillow, his 1867–1869 leadership of the Ku Klux Klan and his political influence as a Tennessee delegate at the 1868 Democratic National Convention. He then withdrew from the organization. Lacking coordinated leadership and facing strong prosecution by President Grant and the newly established U.S. Department of Justice, the members of this first incarnation of the Klan absconded and it gradually disappeared. For a time after the war, Forrest operated a prison labor camp where prisoners, primarily black men arrested for "vagrancy" or other similar charges, had their involuntary labor auctioned to private bidders, to the benefit of the buyers and the prison officials. However, in the last years of his life, Forrest publicly denounced the violence and racism practiced by the Klan, insisted he had never been a member and made at least one public speech (to a black audience) in favor of racial harmony. Although scholars admire Forrest as a military strategist, he has remained a highly controversial figure in Southern history, especially for his role in the attack on Fort Pillow, his 1867–1869 leadership of the Ku Klux Klan and his political influence as a Tennessee delegate at the 1868 Democratic National Convention.

  • Bellevue, Tennessee

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    Bellevue is a neighborhood of Nashville roughly 13 miles southwest of the downtown area via Interstate 40. It is served by the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County. The 2016 population estimates for Bellevue's two main zip codes was 77,862. In the 1950s, Bellevue was a small community which existed primarily to serve the needs of nearby farms. It was mostly along the railroad tracks near the Harpeth River, and had only a few buildings such as a hardware store, post office, and a Masonic lodge hall. The suburbanization was made official when the United States Postal Service changed the office's designation from "Bellview, Tennessee" to a branch of the Nashville office in the late 1970s. Since the year 2000, Bellevue has grown in population and development in the established areas along Old Hickory Boulevard, Sawyer Brown Road, McCrory Lane, and Tennessee State Highway 100. Three commercial retail hotspots in the Bellevue area are near the Highway 70S/I-40 interchange, at the intersection of Highway 70S and Old Hickory Boulevard; and near the intersection of Old Harding Pike and Highway 100.

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