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  • Legality of cannabis

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    countries that have legalized medical use of cannabis. The legality of cannabis for medical and recreational use varies by country, in terms of its possession, distribution, and cultivation, and (in regards to medical) how it can be consumed and what medical conditions it can be used for. These policies in most countries are regulated by the United Nations Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs that was ratified in 1961, along with the 1971 Convention on Psychotropic Substances and the 1988 Convention against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances. The use of cannabis for recreational purposes is prohibited in most countries; however, many have adopted a policy of decriminalization to make simple possession a non-criminal offense (often similar to a minor traffic violation). Others have much more severe penalties such as some Asian and Middle Eastern countries where possession of even small amounts is punished by imprisonment for several years. Uruguay and Canada are the only countries that have fully legalized the consumption and sale of recreational cannabis nationwide.

  • Legality of cannabis by U.S. jurisdiction

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    In the United States, the use and possession of cannabis is illegal under federal law for any purpose, by way of the Controlled Substances Act of 1970. Under the CSA, cannabis is classified as a Schedule I substance, determined to have a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use – thereby prohibiting even medical use of the drug. At the state level, however, policies regarding the medical and recreational use of cannabis vary greatly, and in many states conflict significantly with federal law. The medical use of cannabis is legal (with a doctor's recommendation) in 33 states, the District of Columbia, and the territories of Guam and Puerto Rico. Fourteen other states have laws that limit THC content, for the purpose of allowing access to products that are rich in cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive component of cannabis. Although cannabis remains a Schedule I drug, the Rohrabacher–Farr amendment prohibits federal prosecution of individuals complying with state medical cannabis laws.

  • Effects of legalized cannabis

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    A sign supporting marijuana legalization at the Wayne Morse Free Speech Plaza in Eugene, Oregon Cannabis is a legal recreational and medical drug in several countries and US states and there have been several effects of the drug being legalized.

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