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  • List of adverse effects of aripiprazole

    serch.it?q=List-of-adverse-effects-of-aripiprazole

    The rates of adverse effects of aripiprazole are:

  • Metoprolol

    serch.it?q=Metoprolol

    Metoprolol, marketed under the tradename Lopressor among others, is a medication of the selective β1 receptor blocker type. It is used to treat high blood pressure, chest pain due to poor blood flow to the heart, and a number of conditions involving an abnormally fast heart rate. It is also used to prevent further heart problems after myocardial infarction and to prevent headaches in those with migraines. Metoprolol is sold in formulations that can be taken by mouth or given intravenously. The medication is often taken twice a day. The extended-release formulation is taken once per day. Metoprolol may be combined with hydrochlorothiazide (a diuretic) in a single tablet. Common side effects include trouble sleeping, feeling tired, feeling faint, and abdominal discomfort. Large doses may cause serious toxicity. Risk in pregnancy has not been ruled out. It appears to be safe in breastfeeding. Greater care is required with use in those with liver problems or asthma. Stopping this drug should be done slowly to decrease the risk of further health problems. Metoprolol was first made in 1969. It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system. It is available as a generic drug. In 2016 it was the 6th most prescribed medication in the United States with more than 74 million prescriptions.

  • List of withdrawn drugs

    serch.it?q=List-of-withdrawn-drugs

    Drugs or medicines may be withdrawn from commercial markets because of risks to patients, but also because of commercial reasons (e.g. lack of demand and relatively high production costs). Where risks or harms is the reason for withdrawal, this will usually have been prompted by unexpected adverse effects that were not detected during Phase III clinical trials, i.e. they were only made apparent from postmarketing surveillance data collected from the wider community over longer periods of time. This list is not limited to drugs that were ever approved by the FDA. Some of them (lumiracoxib, rimonabant, tolrestat, ximelagatran and ximelidine, for example) were approved to be marketed in Europe but had not yet been approved for marketing in the US, when side effects became clear and their developers pulled them from the market. Some drugs in this list (e.g. LSD) were never approved for marketing in the US or Europe.

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