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  • Crankshaft position sensor

    serch.it?q=Crankshaft-position-sensor

    Typical inductive crankshaft position sensor A crank sensor is an electronic device used in an internal combustion engine, both petrol and diesel, to monitor the position or rotational speed of the crankshaft. This information is used by engine management systems to control the fuel injection or the ignition system timing and other engine parameters. Before electronic crank sensors were available, the distributor would have to be manually adjusted to a timing mark on petrol engines. The crank sensor can be used in combination with a similar camshaft position sensor to monitor the relationship between the pistons and valves in the engine, which is particularly important in engines with variable valve timing. This method is also used to "synchronise" a four stroke engine upon starting, allowing the management system to know when to inject the fuel. It is also commonly used as the primary source for the measurement of engine speed in revolutions per minute. Common mounting locations include the main crank pulley, the flywheel, the camshaft or on the crankshaft itself. This sensor is the 2nd most important sensor in modern-day engines after the camshaft position sensor.

  • Timing belt (camshaft)

    serch.it?q=Timing-belt-(camshaft)

    Timing belt A timing belt, timing chain, or cambelt is a part of an internal combustion engine that synchronizes the rotation of the crankshaft and the camshaft(s) so that the engine's valves open and close at the proper times during each cylinder's intake and exhaust strokes. In an interference engine the timing belt or chain is also critical to preventing the piston from striking the valves. A timing belt is usually a toothed belt—a drive belt with teeth on the inside surface. A timing chain is a roller chain. Cosworth BDR engine, with timing belt and pulleys Many modern production automobile engines use a timing belt to synchronize crankshaft and camshaft rotation; some engines, particularly cam in block designs, used gears to drive the camshaft, but this was rare for OHC designs. The use of a timing belt or chain instead of gear drive enables engine designers to place the camshaft(s) further from the crankshaft, and in engines with multiple camshafts a timing belt or chain also enables the camshafts to be placed further from each other.

  • Crankshaft position sensor

    serch.it?q=Crankshaft-position-sensor

    Typical inductive crankshaft position sensor A crank sensor is an electronic device used in an internal combustion engine, both petrol and diesel, to monitor the position or rotational speed of the crankshaft. This information is used by engine management systems to control the fuel injection or the ignition system timing and other engine parameters. Before electronic crank sensors were available, the distributor would have to be manually adjusted to a timing mark on petrol engines. The crank sensor can be used in combination with a similar camshaft position sensor to monitor the relationship between the pistons and valves in the engine, which is particularly important in engines with variable valve timing. This method is also used to "synchronise" a four stroke engine upon starting, allowing the management system to know when to inject the fuel. It is also commonly used as the primary source for the measurement of engine speed in revolutions per minute. Common mounting locations include the main crank pulley, the flywheel, the camshaft or on the crankshaft itself. This sensor is the 2nd most important sensor in modern-day engines after the camshaft position sensor.

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