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  • Lennox–Gastaut syndrome

    serch.it?q=Lennox–Gastaut-syndrome

    Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS) is a complex, rare, and severe childhood-onset epilepsy. It is characterized by multiple and concurrent seizure types, cognitive dysfunction, and slow spike waves on electroencephalogram (EEG). Typically, it presents in children aged 3–5 years and can persist into adulthood. It has been associated with several gene mutations, perinatal insults, congenital infections, brain tumors/malformations, and genetic disorders such as tuberous sclerosis and West syndrome. The prognosis for LGS is poor with a 5% mortality in childhood and persistent seizures into adulthood (80%–90%). LGS was named for neurologists William G. Lennox (Boston, USA) and Henri Gastaut (Marseille, France). The international LGS Awareness Day is on November 1st.

  • Aura (symptom)

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    An aura is a perceptual disturbance experienced by some with migraines or seizures. The aura stage precedes a seizure in epilepsy but can happen at any stage of a migraine. It often manifests as the perception of a strange light, an unpleasant smell, or confusing thoughts or experiences. Some people experience aura without a subsequent migraine or seizure (see silent migraine). Auras vary by individual experience; some people experience smells, lights, or hallucinations. Less known symptoms of the eye include disturbances, where the eyes roll in the back of the head caused by photosensitivity. A sufferer of this type of aura may experience tearfulness of the eyes and uncontrollable sensations of light followed by reduced symptoms after approximately 20 minutes; it is the rarest type of aura. When occurring, auras allow people who have epilepsy time to prevent injury to themselves and/or others. The time between the appearance of the aura and the migraine lasts from a few seconds up to an hour. The aura can stay with a migraine sufferer for the duration of the migraine; depending on the type of aura, it can leave the person disoriented and confused. It is common for migraine sufferers to experience more than one type of aura during the migraine. Most people who have auras have the same type of aura every time. Auras can also be confused with sudden onset of panic, panic attacks or anxiety attacks creating difficulties in diagnosis. The differential diagnosis of patients who experience symptoms of paresthesias, derealization, dizziness, chest pain, tremors, and palpitations can be quite challenging.

  • Epileptologist

    serch.it?q=Epileptologist

    An epileptologist is a neurologist who specializes in the treatment of epilepsy. Epileptologists are experts in epileptic seizures and seizure disorders, anticonvulsants, and special situations involving seizures, such as cases in which all treatment intended to stop seizures has failed and epilepsy (especially poorly controlled epilepsy) in pregnant women. Some epileptologists specialize in treatment of epilepsy in children. An epileptologist is not necessary for the treatment of all seizure disorders, and is generally only consulted if seizures do not stop, despite treatment from a regular physician or neurologist.

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