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  • Bedford Vehicles

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    Bedford Vehicles, usually shortened to just Bedford, was a brand of vehicle manufactured by Vauxhall Motors, which was ultimately owned by General Motors (GM). Established in April 1931 and constructing commercial vehicles, Bedford Vehicles was a leading international lorry brand, with substantial export sales of light, medium, and heavy lorries throughout the world. It was General Motors Europe's most profitable venture for several years. Bedford's core heavy trucks business was divested by GM as AWD Trucks in 1987, whilst the Bedford brand continued to be used on light commercial vehicles and car-derived vans based on Vauxhall/Opel, Isuzu and Suzuki designs. The brand was retired in 1991; subsequent GM Europe light commercials were branded as either Vauxhall or Opel, depending on the market.

  • Emergency vehicle lighting

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    Emergency vehicle lighting, such as that seen on this 1970s ambulance, helps to announce the vehicle’s presence to other road users. Swedish police vehicle. Rotating beaconEmergency vehicle lighting is one or more visual warning lights fitted to a vehicle for use when the driver wishes to convey to other road users the urgency of their journey, to provide additional warning of a hazard when stationary, or in the case of law enforcement as a means of signalling another driver to stop for interaction with an officer. These lights may be dedicated emergency lights, such as a beacon or a light bar, or may be modified stock lighting, such as a wig-wag or hide-away light, and are additional to any standard lighting on the car such as hazard lights. Often, they are used along with a siren (or occasionally sirens) in order to increase their effectiveness. In many jurisdictions, the use of these lights may afford the user specific legal powers, and may place requirements on other road users to behave differently, such as compelling them to pull to the side of the road and yield right of way so the emergency vehicle may proceed through unimpeded.

  • Cadillac Commercial Chassis

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    1959 Cadillac hearse The Cadillac Commercial Chassis was basically a strengthened version of the long-wheelbase Cadillac Series 355 frame and the Series 75 was intended to carry the extra weight of the bodywork, rear deck and cargo area of funeral coaches and ambulances. Specifically designed for professional car use, it used the GM D platform, and the rear of the Cadillac Commercial Chassis was considerably lower than the passenger car frame, thereby lowering the rear deck height as well for ease of loading and unloading. As shipped from the factory to custom coachbuilders for final assembly, Cadillac's Commercial Chassis typically consisted of the front end sheetmetal with all lighting and trim, dashboard, air conditioning (if specified) and the main road controls. Rear quarter panels and sometimes the front door shells were shipped with the chassis for use in the finished vehicle. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards in the United States and Canada calling for increased weight ratings as of the 1979 model year spelled the end of automobile-based ambulances and the beginning of the van and truck-based units seen today throughout North America.

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