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  • Oil cooling

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    Oil cooling is the use of engine oil as a coolant, typically to remove surplus heat from an internal combustion engine. The hot engine transfers heat to the oil which then usually passes through a heat-exchanger, typically a type of radiator known as an oil cooler. The cooled oil flows back into the hot object to cool it continuously.

  • Suzuki Advanced Cooling System

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    The Suzuki Advanced Cooling System (SACS) was developed by Suzuki engineer Etsuo Yokouchi in the early 1980s. The system was used extensively on GSXR model bikes from 1985 through 1992. Suzuki continued to use the system in its GSF (Bandit) and GSX (GSX-F, GSX1400, Inazuma) lines until the 2006 model-year and DR650 from 1990 to present. Engines using the SACS system were generally regarded as being very durable.

  • Dry sump

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    Schematic diagram of a basic dry-sump engine lubrication system. The oil collects in sump (1), is withdrawn continuously by scavenge pump (2) and travels to the oil tank (3), where gases entrained in the oil separate and the oil cools. Gases (6) are returned to the engine sump. Pressure pump (4) forces the de-gassed and cooled oil (5) back to the engine's lubrication points (7). A dry-sump system is a method to manage the lubricating motor oil in four-stroke and large two-stroke piston driven internal combustion engines. The dry-sump system uses two or more oil pumps and a separate oil reservoir, as opposed to a conventional wet-sump system, which uses only the main sump (U.S.: oil pan) below the engine and a single pump. A dry-sump engine requires a pressure relief valve to regulate negative pressure inside the engine, so internal seals are not inverted. Engines are both lubricated and cooled by oil that circulates throughout the engine, feeding various bearings and other moving parts and then draining, via gravity, into the sump at the base of the engine. In the wet-sump system of most production automobile engines, a pump collects this oil from the sump and directly circulates it back through the engine. In a dry-sump, the oil still falls to the base of the engine, however instead of collecting in a reservoir-style oil sump, it falls into a much shallower sump, where one or more scavenge pumps draw it away and transfer it to a (usually external) reservoir, where it is both cooled and de-aerated before being recirculated through the engine by a pressure pump. Dry-sump designs frequently mount the pressure pump and scavenge pumps on a common crankshaft, so that one pulley at the front of the system can run as many pumps as the engine design requires. It is common practice to have one scavenge pump per crankcase section, however in the case of inverted engines (aircraft engine) it is necessary to employ separate scavenge pumps for each cylinder bank. Therefore, an inverted V engine would have a minimum of two scavenge pumps and a pressure pump in the pump stack. The main purpose of the dry-sump system is to contain all the stored oil in a separate tank, or reservoir. This reservoir is usually tall and round or narrow and specially designed with internal baffles, and an oil outlet (supply) at the very bottom for uninhibited oil supply. The dry-sump oil pump is a minimum of 2 stages, with as many as 5 or 6. One stage is for pressure and is supplied the oil from the bottom of the reservoir, and along with an adjustable pressure regulator, supplies the oil under pressure through the filter and into the engine. The remaining stages "scavenge" the oil out of the dry-sump pan and return the oil (and gasses) to the top of the tank or reservoir. If an oil cooler is used usually it is mounted inline between the scavenge outlets and the tank. The dry-sump pump is usually driven by a Gilmer or HTD timing belt and pulleys, off the front of the crankshaft, at approximately one half crank speed. The dry-sump pump is designed with multiple stages to ensure that all the oil is scavenged from the pan and also to allow removal of excess air from the crankcase.

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