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  • Chevrolet small-block engine

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    The Chevrolet small-block engine is a series of V8 automobile engines used in normal production by the Chevrolet Division of General Motors between 1955 and 2003, using the same basic engine block. Referred to as a "small block" for its comparative size relative to the physically much larger Chevrolet big-block engines, the family spanned from to in displacement. Retroactively referred to as the "Generation I" small-block, it is distinct from subsequent "Generation II" LT and "Generation III/IV" LS, and "Generation V" (LT/EcoTec3) engines. Engineer Ed Cole is credited with leading the design for this engine. Production of the original small-block began in the fall of 1954 for the 1955 model year with a displacement of , growing incrementally over time to 400 cu in by 1970. Among the intermediate displacements were the , , and numerous versions. Introduced as a performance engine in 1967, the 350 went on to be employed in both high- and low-output variants across the entire Chevrolet product line.

  • Oldsmobile 442

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    The Oldsmobile 4-4-2 (also known as the 442) is a muscle car produced by Oldsmobile between the 1964 and 1980 model years. Introduced as an option package for US-sold F-85 and Cutlass models, it became a model in its own right from 1968 to 1971, spawned the Hurst/Olds in 1968, then reverted to an option through the mid-1970s. The name was revived in the 1980s on the rear-wheel drive Cutlass Supreme and early 1990s as an option package for the new front-wheel drive Cutlass Calais. The "4-4-2" name (pronounced "Four-four-two") derives from the original car's four-barrel carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, and dual exhausts (Some maintain that the '2' indicated positive traction rear differential). It was originally written "4-4-2" (with badging showing hyphens between the numerals), and remained hyphenated throughout Oldsmobile's use of the designation. Beginning in 1965, the 4-4-2s standard transmission was a 3 speed manual along with optional 2 speed automatic and 4 speed manual, but were still badged as "4-4-2"s. By 1968 badging was shortened to simply "442", but Oldsmobile brochures and internal documents continued to use the "4-4-2" model designation.

  • Oldsmobile V8 engine

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    Toronado's 425 V8, the first post-war front-wheel drive V8 application. The Oldsmobile V8 refers to a series of Oldsmobile engines beginning with the advanced 1949 Rocket which were, along with the 1949 Cadillac V8, the first post-war OHV V8 engines produced by General Motors. Like all other GM divisions, Olds continued building its own V8 engine family for decades, finally adopting the corporate Chevrolet 350 small-block and Cadillac Northstar engine only in the 1990s. All Oldsmobile V8s were manufactured at plants in Lansing, Michigan. All Oldsmobile V8s use a 90° bank angle, and most share a common stroke dimension: for early Rockets, for later Generation 1 engines, and for Generation 2 starting in 1964. The , , , and engines are commonly called small-blocks. , , and V8s have a higher deck height ( versus ) to accommodate a stroke crank to increase displacement. These taller-deck models are commonly called "big-blocks", and are taller and wider than their "small-block" counterparts. The Rocket V8 was the subject of many first and lasts in the automotive industry. It was the first mass-produced OHV V8, in 1949. The factory painted "small-blocks" gold or blue (flat black on the late model ), while "big-blocks" could be red, green, blue, or bronze. As is the case with all pre-1972 American passenger car engines, published horsepower and torque figures for those years were SAE "Gross," as opposed to 1972 and later SAE Net ratings (which are indicative of what actual production engines produce in their "as installed" state - with all engine accessories, full air cleaner assembly, and full factory exhaust system in-place).

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